Afdrukken

The main results of this project are as follows. First, the first phase of the study revealed that there was a significant variation among schools (within and across countries) on the extent to which students are being bullied or bully others and on the functioning of school factors included in the proposed framework. Second, data emerged from this phase provided support to the validity of the OBVQ and of the questionnaire measuring the functioning of school factors. During the second phase, we were in a position to demonstrate the validity of: a) the social cognition test and b) the student questionnaire measuring the quality of school life. These instruments can be used for research and for improvement efforts by schools in the participating countries. Third, qualitative data collected during the second phase of the project revealed that schools did not face significant difficulties in developing their own school self evaluation mechanisms and generally supported the proposed dynamic approach to face and reduce bullying. Fourth, using multilevel modelling techniques, it was found out that there were significant differences among schools in their effectiveness status in terms of reducing bulling. The importance of school effect was demonstrated by using either data emerged from the scale A of OBVQ (which refers to the extent to which students are being victimised) or the scale B (which refers to the extent to which students bully others). Fifth, the multilevel analysis revealed that schools which made use of the dynamic approach were able to reduce bullying at a significantly higher level than the schools of the control group. The use of the dynamic approach to face bullying had also a significant effect in the development of positive attitudes towards schooling but this effect was smaller than the effect that the dynamic approach had on reduction of bullying. Sixth, the use of the dynamic approach to reduce bullying had almost no effect on students' social cognition. This finding could be attributed to the fact that most schools developed strategies and actions which were concerned with the improvement of the school learning environment rather than with the provision of further learning opportunities. Finally, in some countries it was possible to collect data on the functioning of school factors both at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. In these countries, it is demonstrated that schools which made use of the dynamic approach managed to improve the functioning of school factors at a higher level than the schools of the control group. Moreover, those schools which managed to improve their school factors were found to be more effective in terms of reducing bullying.

View Executive Summary (.pdf 72.5KB)

View Implications of Findings (.pdf 5.66KB)

View Full Executive Summary Document (.pdf 78.5KB)