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POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Master in Physics

Doctoral Program in Physics

 Courses for Student Work Placement

 

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CORE COURSES

PHY 625 - Quantum Mechanics Ι

PHY 626 - Quantum Mechanics II

PHY 631 - Electromagnetism

PHY 641 - Statistical Physics

PHY 811 - Experimental Physics

 

SPECIALIZATION COURSES

PHY 650 - Quantum Field Theory I

PHY 651 - Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

PHY 652 - Fiber Optics and Applications in Telecommunications

PHY 653 - Quantum Field Theory II

PHY 654 - Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductors and Semiconductor Nanostructures

PHY 655 - Lattice Gauge Theories

ΡHΥ 656 - Modern Topics in Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics

ΡΗΥ 657 - Quantum Many Body Theory and Applications in Solid State Physics

PHY 658 - Physics of Hot and Compressed Nuclear Matter

PHY 659 - Advanced Topics in Nuclear Physics

PHY 660 - Exotic States of Matter in a Magnetic Field

PHY 661 - Advanced Topics in Particle Physics

PHY 662 - Special Topics in Particle Physics

PHY 663 - Measurement and Detection Techniques of Nuclear Radiation

PHY 664 - Statistical and Computational Physics of Biomolecular Systems

PHY 665 - Quantum Mechanics of Biomolecular Systems: Theoretical and Computational Methods

PHY 667 - Group Theory

PHY 668 - Terahertz Pulse Spectroscopy

PHY 669 - Optical Properties of Semiconductors

PHY 670 - Spintronics

PHY 671 - Nanomagnetism and Applications

PHY 672 - Introduction to SuperSymmetry

PHY 673 - Particle Detectors – Physics and Applications

PHY 674 - Physics at the TeV Regime

PHY 675 - Principles of Mössbauer Spectroscopy 

PHY 901 & PHY 902 - Work Placement

 

PHY 625 - Quantum Mechanics Ι 

  • Double slit experiments: Complementarity principle as more fundamental than the Uncertainty principle, its quantification with recent inequalities, Quantum Eraser.
  • Dirac formalism: applications but also its "dangers" (cases of Hermiticity but non-self-adjointness), emergent non-Hermiticity in Ehrenfest and Hellmann-Feynman theorems.
  • Position and Momentum Representations: systems with spatially-uniform force fields, Propagators, Harmonic Oscillator.
  • Schrödinger Picture: Conservation laws, dynamical symmetries and degeneracies, Galilean transformations.
  • Angular momentum (orbital and spin): Pauli algebra, systems with bound states.
  • Quantum particle in external electric and magnetic fields: gauge transformations (ordinary but also singular), magnetic Aharonov-Bohm (ΑΒ) effect and relevant nanosystems, Electric fields and time-dependent Hamiltonians, electric AB effect, Landau Levels, Quantum Hall Effect.
  • Perturbation theories and time-dependent phenomena.
  • Adiabatic Approximation: geometric and topological phases (Berry curvature, Aharonov-Anandan phase).
The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 626 - Quantum Mechanics II  

Symmetries: Definition, Types of symmetries, Physical consequences. Symmetries of Classical and Quantum Mechanics. Lorentz group, unitary groups. Noether's theorem.
Relativistic Quantum Mechanics: Klein-Gordon, Dirac equation. Relativistic spin. Relativistic study of hydrogen. Elements of second quantization.
Classical Fields: Action of Electromagnetism. Gauge symmetry. Non-Abelian fields. Energy-momentum tensor.
Introduction to the Standard Model: Coupling of fermions to gauge fields. Chiral Lagrangians. Coupling to the Higgs field. Spontaneous violation of gauge symmetry. CKM matrix.
Scattering theory: Green's functions. Asymptotic states. Potential scattering. Born approximation. Optical theorem. Partial wave analysis. Analytic properties of scattering amplitudes. Resonances.
Special topics in Perturbation Theory: Time-dependent perturbations. Radiation emission and absorption. Raman scattering.
Functional integrals: Heisenberg – Schrödinger pictures. The propagator as a sum over paths. The role of functional integrals in the quantum description of particles fields and strings. Computational methods for functional integrals.
Many-body systems: Atoms. Calculational methods. Hartree – Fock approximation.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 631 - Electromagnetism  

Electrostatics and Magnhtostatics: Boundary value problems, Electric and magnetic dipole moments, multipole moments, Static fields in matter, Conductors, Dielectrics, Magnetic materials, Electromagnetic forces and energy. Time varying fields: Maxwell equations, Gauge transformations, The electromagnetic energy density, Poynting vector and Maxwell stress tensor, Conservation laws, Advanced and retarded Green functions, Lorentz transformations of the electromagnetic fields. Electromagnetic waves in matter, Dispersion, Applications in optics, Waveguides, Simple harmonic radiating systems, Dipole radiation, The Lienard-Wiechert potentials, Radiation by moving charges and applications.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 641 - Statistical Physics  

Useful mathematical topics: combinatorics, probability distributions, random walks and processes, Lagrange multipliers. Entropy. Derivation of the microcanonical, canonical, grand canonical probability distributions for classical and quantum systems with emphasis on the concept of entropy. Derivation of thermodynamics from statistical mechanics. Thermodynamic potentials. Ideal gases of distinguishable and indistinguishable particles (Fermions and Bosons), and applications to photons, phonons and electrons. Bose-Einstein condensation. From quantum to classical statistical mechanics. The chemical potentials and its use in diffusive-equilibrium and chemical equilibrium problems. Statistical mechanics of interacting particles. Phase transitions. Ising model. Topics in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics (approach to equilibrium from the point of view of stochastic processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations).

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

  

 PHY 811 - Experimental Physics 

  • Fluorescent/phosphorescent decay time: use of an optical setup with a pulsed laser to excite a variety of fluorescent and/or phosphorescent materials in order to determine characteristic decay times. The time dependent information is obtained via the use of boxcar integrator electronics.
  • Gamma ray Spectroscopy: use of an ultra-pure Ge detector at low temperature for measurements of gamma ray spectra. Use of specialised pulse amplification and conditioning electronics.
  • Non-ionising Radiation: use of a spectrum analyser for the analysis of electromagnetic signals ranging in frequency from 10 Hz to 10 GHz.
  • Photothermal radiometry: Measurement of photoinduced thermal response. Use of cryogen cooled infrared photodetector and acousto-optically modulated photoexcitation in combination with a lock-in technique.
  • Paramagnetic Resonance: Measurement of the gyromagnetic ratio of the electron using an electron spin resonance experiment and lock-in techniques.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 650 - Quantum Field Theory I 

The Dirac equation. Compatibility with Special Relativity. Relation to the Pauli equation. Solutions of the free equation and their interpretation. Solutions in the presence of an electromagnetic field. The Klein - Gordon equation for a scalar field and its quantization. Quantization of fermions. Quantization of photons. Discrete symmetries C, P, T. The relation between spin and statistics. Interacting fields and their quantization. The S matrix. Relativistic kinematics. Phase space. Covariant perturbation theory. Calculation of cross sections and decay amplitudes in Quantum Electrodynamics, at tree level. Calculation of weak decays. Comparison of Fermi's weak Hamiltonian to the Standard Model.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 651 - Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena  

• Extensive review of propagation properties of light in time and frequency domains
• Ultrashort light pulse interaction with matter.
• Coherent Phenomena
• Ultrashort Sources and femtosecond pulse amplification
• Pulse Shaping and diagnostic techniques
• Femtosecond Spectroscopy
• Examples of Ultrafast Processes in Matter
• Generation of Extreme Wavelengths
 
The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 652 - Fiber Optics and Applications in Telecommunications 

• Fiber optics fundamentals, introduction to fiber optics and planar waveguides
• Chromatic Dispersion, Losses and Loss mechanism in optical fiber
• Fabrication of optical fiber, material properties
• Non-linear phenomena in optical fiber
• Measurements of important fiber characteristics
• Introduction to photosensitivity in optical fibers, fabrication of Bragg gratings in optical fibers and their properties, theory of Bragg gratings
• Basic fiber optic communication systems, applications of fibers and fiber Bragg gratings for telecommunications

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 653 - Quantum Field Theory II  

Perturbative corrections in Quantum Electrodynamics: Introduction to Renormalization, Magnetic moment of the electron, Infrared and Ultraviolet infinities in loop diagrams, Renormalization of the fermion field and of the electric charge, LSZ reduction, Optical theorem, Ward identity. Systematics of Renormalization. Dimensional regularization. Perturbation theory to one loop and beyond. Functional Quantization: Functional integrals in Quantum Mechanics and in Field Theory. Connection to Statistical Mechanics. Quantization of fermions and gauge fields. Renormalization à la Wilson. Renormalization group. The Callan – Symanzik equation. The running of the coupling constant. Non-Abelian Gauge Theories: Gauge symmetries, Yang – Mills theory, Feynman rules, Faddeev – Popov quantization and ghost fields, BRST transformation, asymptotic freedom. The Standard Model: Spontaneous symmetry breaking and Goldstone bosons, the Higgs mechanism and generation of masses, the CKM matrix, CP violation. Study, to one-loop level, of the decays of the Higgs boson and of the top quark. 

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 654 - Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductors and Semiconductor Nanostructures  

• Semiconductor basic concepts, band Structure, Excitons, Phonons.
• Scattering processes in semiconductors, carrier relaxation and carrier transport.
• Ultrafast Lasers, Ultrafast Spectroscopy techniques and Interpretation of results.
• Coherent Spectroscopy of Semiconductors,
• Initial relaxation of photo-excited carriers, cooling of hot carriers, Phonon and Exciton Dynamics.
• Carrier Tunneling in Semiconductor Nanostructures.
• Carrier Transport in Semiconductor Nanostructures.
• Monte-Carlo Simulation of Carrier and Phonon dynamics.
• Experimental Pump-probe techniques, Luminescence Spectroscopy

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 655 - Lattice Gauge Theories 

The path integral approach to quantization. Euclidean quantum field theory. Quantum fields on a lattice. Continuum limit and critical behavior. The free scalar field on the lattice.Fermions on the lattice. Wilson fermions, Kogut-Susskind staggered fermions, Nielsen-Ninomiya theorem. Abelian gauge fields on the lattice and compact QED. Non-Abelian gauge fields on the lattice, compact QCD. Strong coupling expansion. Hopping parameter expansion. Quark-antiquark potential. Glueball spectrum. Phase structure of lattice gauge theory. Weak coupling expansion in scalar theories and in QCD. The continuum limit of lattice QCD. The beta function and asymptotic freedom. MonteCarlo Methods. Numerical simulation and Markov processes. Algorithms: Metropolis, Heatbath, Overrelaxation. Simulation of fermions: Hybrid MonteCarlo, Multiboson algorithms. Deconfinement and chiral phase transition. High temperature phase of QCD. 

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

  

ΡHΥ 656 - Modern Topics in Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics  

The quantum physics of electrons around and inside an applied Magnetic Field (magnetic Aharonov-Bohm Effect, Integer and Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (QHE), Composite Fermions) – Two-dimensional electron-hole systems and their hidden symmetries (conservation of pseudomomentum in a single-particle but also in a many-body framework) – Wigner crystal and competitive (liquid and solid) phases. Graphene and its unconventional QHE – Topological Insulators and how they are protected by quantum discrete symmetries – Topological (Dirac and Weyl) Semimetals – Topological Superconductors and Majorana Fermions.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

  

ΡΗΥ 657 - Quantum Many Body Theory and Applications in Solid State Physics 

Fock space - Second Quantization. Many-particle Green's functions - Matsubara formalism. Linear Response Theories. Dielectric formulation in long-range interaction (Coulomb) systems and self-consistent theories of Screening. Phase diagram of Interacting Electrons (including the Wigner Crystal Phase). Functional Integrals and Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation: application to Plasmons and Cooper Pairing (Nambu-Gorkov fοrmalism) for Superconductivity, but also for electron-hole pairing in the Excitonic Insulator Phase.

The objectives and learning outcome of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)  

 

PHY 658 - Physics of Hot and Compressed Nuclear Matter  

1. Creation of hot and compressed nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies
2. Chiral dynamic of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)
3. Chiral symmetries
4. Breakdown and restoration of chiral symmetries in an environment of hot and compressed hadronic matter
5. Experimental signature of chiral symmetry restoration in heavy-ion collisions
6. Particle and resonance production close their production energy threshold
7. Production of vector mesons in a hadronic environment
8. Production and spectroscopy of dileptons in heavy-ion collisions

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 659 - Advanced Topics in Nuclear Physics  

1. Fundamental building blocks and interactions in the subatomic nucleus
2. Creation and interactions of compound nuclear systems
3. Chiral symmetry and chiral dynamics in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD)
4. Nuclear reactions
5. Production of mesons and resonances
6. Accelerators and detection systems

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 660 - Exotic States of Matter in a Magnetic Field 

Integer Quantum Hall Effect in conventional heterostructures and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Graphene. Topological Insulators and Dirac and Weyl Semimetals in a magnetic field, exotic magnetoelectric properties (with appearance of magnetic monopoles), Fractional Quantun Hall Effect and Composite Fermions. Wigner Crystal in 3- and 2-Dimensional Condensed Matter, Competition with Laughlin Liquid and with Fractional Quantum Hall Effect States. Paired Electronic States and the Passage to Exotic Superconductivity. Bubble and Stripe Phases in Higher Landau Levels. 

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 661 - Advanced Topics in Particle Physics  

Quantum Electrodynamics, Weak Interactions, Gauge Symmetries in the Basic Interactions, Electroweak Unification – the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam Model, Higgs Mechanism, problems of the Standard Model, Supersymmetry and Dark Matter, Detector systems in High Energy Physics.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 662 - Special Topics in Particle Physics  

Neutrino Oscillations or Physics of Electron-Positron Colliders or Physics of Proton-(Anti)Proton Colliders or Cosmology and Particle Physics (depending on the relevant area where the student will work), Detector Systems and Search Methods for new particles or data processing.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

  

PHY 663 - Measurement and Detection Techniques of Nuclear Radiation

Introduction to nuclear radiation
Statistical distributions and experimental errors in radiation measurements
Interaction of nuclear radiation with matter
Nuclear electronics
Gas-filled detectors
Scintillation detectors
Semiconductor detectors
Introduction to nuclear spectroscopy
Determination of activity concentration of radioisotope
Dosimetry
Application of nuclear radiation to medicine

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 664 - Statistical and Computational Physics of Biomolecular Systems 

Theoretical topics: Elements of protein and nucleic acid structure. Intra- and intermolecular interactions in biomolecular systems. Thermodynamics of biomolecular systems. The effect of solvent on the thermodynamic stability of biopolymers. Implicit solvent models (from liquid state theory and continuum electrostatics). Statistical mechanical theories of protein stability and folding. Computational topics: Hamiltonians employed in atomic-detail simulations of biomolecules. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Basic concepts (MD algorithms; MD in various ensembles; Langevin dynamics). MD simulation methods for the efficient sampling of biomolecular phase space. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; General methodology. MC simulation methods for the efficient sampling of biomolecular phase space. Protein folding simulations in implicit and explicit solvent. Free-energy calculations in biomolecular systems. Theory and implementation. Computational applications: This part is carried out as a set of computational exercises, utilizing specialized software (e.g., CHARMM, UHBD). Energy minimization methods and determination of normal modes of vibration in biomolecular systems. MD simulations in vacuum; Heating, equilibration and production stages. MD simulations with implicit solvent models. MD simulations in explicit solvent; periodic boundary conditions; stochastic boundary conditions. Principal Component Analysis of MD trajectories. Free-Energy Perturbation calculations; application in biomolecular systems. Determination of the electrostatic field of a solvated biomolecule by finite-difference solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 665 - Quantum Mechanics of Biomolecular Systems: Theoretical and Computational Methods  

• Basics of structure and function of most important biomolecules (proteins, DNA, RNA)
• Electronic and vibrational states of molecules: The Born-Oppenheimer approximation, molecular electronic states, and potential energy surfaces. Molecular vibrational states, normal coordinates, and electron-phonon coupling. The adiabatic and diabatic representations of the molecular Hamiltonian.
• Quantum mechanics of open systems: The reduced density matrix for a system interacting with a bath. The bath correlation function. Quantum master equations. The Markov approximation and the Redfield equations for calculation of quantum transition rates within the system.
• Methods for the computation of the electronic structure of molecules: Many-electron states. The Hartree-Fock method. The density functional method. Methods based on pertrurbation theory. The configuration interaction method. Electronic structure programs
• Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with classical force fields Molecular dynamics programs
• Applications to biomolecular systems. Charge transfer Reactions: Marcus and Levich-Dogonadze theories. Electron transfer pathways in proteins. DNA electron transfer. Proton transfer in enzymatic reactions.
• Energy transfer reactions: Relaxation and redistribution of vibrational energy in biomolecules. Exciton transfer in photosynthesis.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 667 - Group Theory in Physics  

Symmetries: Definition. Physical consequences of symmetries. Symmetries in Classical Mechanics, Discrete/continuous symmetries, Local/global symmetries.
Finite groups: Reducible representations, Characters, Schur's lemma, Tensor product, Permutation groups, Young tableaux.
Crystallographic groups, Brillouin zones in crystals, Atomic energy level splitting.
Continuous groups: Lie groups, Lie algebras.
Rotation group: Representations in Classical Mechanics. Angular momentum in Quantum Mechanics. Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. Lorentz group and its spinorial representations.
Roots and weights: Dynkin diagrams. Classification of classical groups.
SU(N) groups in Particle Physics: Isospin, Hypercharge, Hadronic spectrum. Model building for Grand Unified Theories.
Supersymmetry: Supersymmetric algebras and groups. Applications to the Supersymmetric Standard Model and to Supergravity.
Infinite dimensional algebras: Virasoro algebra, Kac-Moody algebras. Applications to Conformal Field Theories, and to String Theory.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 668 - Terahertz Pulse Spectroscopy 

This course will provide an up-to-date reference on state of the art terahertz spectroscopic techniques, focusing in particular on time-domain methods based on femtosecond laser sources, and reviewing important recent applications of terahertz spectroscopy in physics. The course will cover the following:

Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy with Photoconductive Antennas.
Nonlinear Optical Techniques for Terahertz Pulse Generation and Detection-Optical Rectification and Electro-optic Sampling.
Time-Resolved Terahertz Spectroscopy and Terahertz Emission Spectroscopy.
Time-Resolved Terahertz Studies of Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors.
Superconductors and Strongly Correlated Electron Materials.
Time-Resolved Terahertz Studies of Conductivity Processes in Novel Electronic Materials.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)  

 

PHY 669 - Optical Properties of Semiconductors 

  • Energy States: Phonons, Electronic/Εxcitonic States, Impurity States, Perturbation of States by Strain/Temperature/Electric/Magnetic Fields
  • Optical Absorption: Interband/Intraband/Excitonic Absorption, Free Carrier/Lattice Absorption, Kramers-Kronig Relationships, Optical Constants, Absorption Spectroscopy
  • Emission: Einstein Relationships, Interband/Excitonic Emission, Impurity Radiative Transitions, Luminescence Spectroscopy
  • Non Radiative Transitions: Recombination via Surface States/Defects/Impurities, Auger
  • Optical Properties of Quantum Structures: Quantum Well/Dots/Wires, Carbon Nanostructures
  • Light Emission Devices: Light Emitting Diodes, Lasers
  • Magneto - Optical Effects: Faraday/ Voigt/ Kerr Effects, Magneto-Absorption/Luminescence, Magneto-Optical Techniques
  • Photovoltaic Structures: Optical Properties of Solar cells: p-n junction, Schottky, inorganic/organic/hybrid heterostructures
The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)  

 

 

PHY 670 - Spintronics  

Introduction: spin physics in solids, spin relaxation mechanisms, spin-orbit interaction, spin coherence in semiconductors.
Spin dependent electronic transport: spin diffusion, spin tunnelling, spin injection/detection, optical spin orientation and spin pumping. Giant and Tunnelling magnetoresistance (GMR and TMR), local and non local phenomena.
Pure spin currents: spin Hall effect (SHE or ISHE), spin caloritronics.
Spintronic devices: magnetic recording, magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer memory and oscillators, spin transistors, spin lasers, devices for logic or quantum computing. 

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)  

 

PHY 671 - Nanomagnetism and Applications  

Introduction: Magnetic materials, Units in Magnetism, Contributions to magnetic energy, Domains and domain walls.
Magnetism in low dimensions: Anisotropy in reduced dimensions, Magnetic textures in thin films and nanostructures, Domain walls.
Dynamics: the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, Ferromagnetic resonance, Domain wall motion.
Experimental techniques: Static and Dynamic Magnetometry, Magnetic imaging, Ultra high purity crystal nanostructure growth.
Exotic states of magnetic textures: Domain wall bound states, vortices, skyrmions.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 672 - Introduction to SuperSymmetry 

• The shortcomings of the Standard Model & the advantages of Supersymmetry (SUSY). A qualitative presentation.
• Weyl, Dirac and Majorana Spinors
• Supersymmetric Algebra, generators and superfields; SUSY transformations
• Structure of SUSY theories: Superpotential, gauge interactions, derivation of Langrangian, F and D terms. SUSY vacuum and spontaneous breaking of SUSY
• Wess – Zumino Model (superpotential, interactions, cancellation of the quadratic divergencies, particle spectrum)
• The Minimal SUSY Standard Model (MSSM): Structure of the superpotential, interactions, unification of the gauge coupling constants, R-parity, soft-SUSY breaking terms
• Renormalization-group Equations for the gauge and Yukawa coupling constants, and the soft SUSY breaking terms: Derivation and solution
• The Higgs sector of MSSM: The scalar sector, the violation of the electroweak gauge symmetry and the spectrum of the Higgs particles
• SUSY spectrum of MSSM: Squarks, Sleptons, Neutralinos, Charginos, Gluinos
• Interactions of MSSM: Tree-level calculations, decay and production of SUSY particles, phephenomenological and cosmological implications (qualitative approach).
• Variants of MSSM – Numerical packages (SoftSUSY, Suspect and MicrOmegas)
• Restriction of the parametric space of MSSM: Mass of the lighter CP-even Higgs boson, rare decays of the B meson, relic abundance of the Lightest SUSY particle (LSP).

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)


PHY 673 - Particle Detectors – Physics and Applications 

• Introduction to the experimental techniques used in nuclear and particle physics
• Design and operational principles of modern detectors used in High Energy Particle Physics
• Topics covered include the theory of interactions of particle with matter, scintillators and time of flight detectors, gas detectors, semiconductor detectors, tracking devices and algorithms for track reconstruction, operation principles of calorimeters and the design of modern calorimeters, detectors for particles identification.
• Triggering and Data acquisition systems.
• Large and complex detectors like the ones in LHC, Tevatron and future lepton colliders.
• Presentation of modern algorithms for jet reconstruction, and for the identification of b-quark and top-quark jets.
• Hands on experience with these algorithms using Monte Carlo events.
• Modern Cherenkov detectors, semiconductor scintillators and photomultipliers, TPC detectors and their use in collider and neutrino experiments.
• Particle physics and particle detectors in medical applications.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

 

PHY 674 - Physics at the TeV Regime  

• Presentation of the Physics at the energy scale of LHC and future hadron and lepton colliders.
• Connection between theory and recent results from LHC experiments with emphasis to topics from the physics of QCD, parton structure functions and hadronization in p-p collisions, emerging phenomena from heavy ion collisions, new observations in the heavy quark sector (top and b), rate B-meson decays, Electroweak gauge bosons, and studies related to the properties of the Higgs boson.
• Presentation of new ways and techniques in searching for SUSY, and other topics related to searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model like dark matter candidates, extra space dimensions, microscopic black holes, flavor changing neutral currents, lepton flavor violation models, composite Higgs models, leptoquarks, technicolor and alternative solutions for the dynamics of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking.
• Connection of the results from LHC to the results from other non-accelerator based experiments and the constraints imposed to various theoretical models.

The objectives and learning outcomes of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top)

  

PHY 675 - Principles of Mössbauer Spectroscopy 

A. Introduction to the Mössbauer spectroscopy – basic principles
1. The γ-ray resonance
2. The Doppler effect
3. The recoil effect
4. Mössbauer effect and the interpretation of the spectra
5. Hyperfine interactions
6. Isomeric shift
7. Electric quadruple splitting
8. Magnetic hyperfine splitting

B. Mössbauer Spectroscopy
1. The Mössbauer spectroscopy experimental setup
2. Calibration procedure
3. Radioactive sources
4. Determination of the valence and the spin
5. Preparation of samples – absorbers
6. Spectra measurements procedure
7. Mössbauer spectra analysis and interpretation

The objectives and learning outcome of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

PHY 901 & PHY 902 - Work Placement 

The objectives and learning outcome of the course as well as the dedicated course website can be found following the respective links. (Back to top) 

 

 

 

 

 

COURSE INFORMATION

Course List

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Distribution of Courses per Semester