I.1 Introductory Courses in Archaeology - Compulsory (1st-3rd Semester)

I.2 Elective Courses in Archaeology (4th-8th Semester)

I.3 Seminars in Archaeology (6th-8th Semester)

 

II.1 Introductory Courses in History - Compulsory (1st-3rd Semester)

II.2 Elective Courses in History (4th-8th Semester)

II.3 Seminars in History (6th-8th Semester)

 

 



 

 

Ι.1 ΙNTRODUCTORY COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY – COMPULSORY (1st -3rd Semester)

 

 

ARC 117 Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology

Instructor: O. Kouka

The course aims to introduce first semester students to Prehistory and Proto-History (pioneers, chronological structure, fieldwork methodology, interpretative approaches), to the basic meanings and the most important stations of culture from the first appearance of humans until the invention and use of writing. Emphasis will be given to Stone Age (Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic) and the transition (Chalcolithic) to the Bronze Age in Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean by studying habitation forms, burial customs and economy (hunters-gatherers, farming, technology, exchange trade).

 

ΑRC 118 Introduction to the Cultures of the Mediterranean Bronze Age

Instructor: M. Iacovou

Introductory course on the archaeology of the Mediterranean cultures during the Bronze Age. The geographical coordinates of the course are defined by the Mesopotamian region to the east and the Greek peninsula to the west. Developments in Mesopotamia in the 3rd-2nd millennia BC. Developments in Egypt in the 3rd-2nd millennia BC (Kingdoms and Intermediate periods). Developments in Cyprus in the 3rd-2nd millennia BC. The NE Aegean culture – type sites (3rd mil.). The Cycladic culture (3rd mil.). The Minoan culture from prepalatial to palatial. The Helladic culture in the 3rd-2nd millennia BC, and the development of the Mycenaean palatial culture in the late Bronze Age.

 

ARC 123 Introduction to Classical Archaeology I

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

The course examines the period from the 11th to the 4th century BC, that is, from the collapse of the Mycenaean world to the death of Alexander. It presents the Geometric, Archaic and Classical times (the Hellenistic period is taught as part of ARC 124). In order to present the specific character of each period, the course presents some representative works and monuments of each era, and analyzes works of sculpture, architecture, vase painting, metalwork, etc.

 

ΑRC 124 Introduction to Classical Archaeology II

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

The course aims to study various features of Greek and Roman antiquity, and to familiarize students with basic knowledge of ancient Greek and Roman civilization. Works of architecture and sculpture, pottery and painting, etc. will be presented in an attempt to approach the relevant material, and to pose and answer questions related to this material. The course is divided into three parts: In the first part, general issues of classical archaeology and terminology will be examined as well as some issues that will facilitate the transition to the second part. In the second part, lessons will focus on the Hellenistic period (about 330-30 BC), on its differences with the classical period, and on the new world created after the conquests of Alexander and the subsequent dissemination of the Greek language and culture. The third part of this course will be devoted to a brief introduction to Roman archaeology, through representative works of architecture, sculpture and painting.

 

ARC 132 Introduction to Byzantine Archaeology and Art

Instructors: M. Parani, A. Vionis

A general review of Byzantine archaeology and art from the 3rd c. AD to the conventional end of the Byzantine era in 1453 AD. Introduction into the basic characteristics and multi-faceted expression of Byzantine material culture, as well as secular and ecclesiastical art.

 

ARC 140 Introduction to Folk Art – Traditional Craftsment

Instructor: [Special Scientist]

The introductory course includes an outline of terminologies such as: Folk Art, Folklore, Material Culture on the basis of earlier and contemporary Greek and foreign bibliography. The course is complemented by a presentation of modern scholarship, focusing on the methodology, as well as interdisciplinary and archival research. The main course covers basic Folk Arts and their Artisans during modern times. The course is preceded by a historical introduction of the period with focus on society and economy. Subsequently, the relations between Cyprus, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean are presented in terms of trade and Material Culture. The Arts and professions discussed are: ceramics, basketry, weaving, embroidery, sewing, wood carving, stone sculpture, architecture, metallurgy, goldsmithing-silversmithing.

 

ARC 141 Introduction to Environmental Archaeology

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

Unlike other more mainstream parts of archaeology, environmental archaeology does not focus on the study of works of art and monuments. Instead, the topic of research are the remains of plants and animals connected with human consumption, agriculture and animal husbandry and even the remains of the people themselves, the study of which can reveal invaluable information about life in antiquity. The aim of this field is to reconstruct past environments and past peoples' relationships and interactions with the landscapes they inhabited. It provides archaeologists with insights into the origin and evolution of anthropogenic environments, and prehistoric adaptations and economic practices. This course is divided into four main sections, each of which deals with a different component of environmental archaeology, namely geoarchaeology, archaeobotany, zooarchaeology and bioarcheology. During the course of the semester, the students will become familiar with the theory and the methodology of the study of environmental remains.

 

ARC 150 Introduction to the History of Western Art (4th-18th C.)

Instructor: M. Olympios

This introductory survey course aims at familiarizing students with major works of western European art of the period extending from the Late Middle Ages to Modernity, as well as with the various methodological approaches employed in their study. The scrutiny of works of architecture, monumental sculpture and painting, together with objects in other artistic media (metalwork, ivory carving, illuminated manuscripts, stained glass etc.) has the purpose of adequately preparing the students for delving into the more specialised subjects taught via 200-level History of Art courses.

 

ARC 180 Introduction to Maritime Archaeology

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to Maritime Archaeology, so that they can: a) understand that the particular character of Maritime Archaeology lies in the interpretative approach of material remains, as parts of maritime civilization, b) study the archaeological remains pertinent to the scope of the domain, and c) learn about the special methods and techniques used in underwater archaeology.

 

 

[Back to Top]


 

 

I.2 ELECTIVE COURSES IN ARCHAEOLOGY (4th-8th Semester)

 


ARC 200 Italian Renaissance Art

Instructor: M. Olympios

The aim of this course is to bring students into contact with the life and career of some of the most creative Italian artists of the Renaissance period (fourteenth-sixteenth centuries), mainly through the study of extant works of architecture, sculpture and painting, whether monumental or otherwise. From Giotto and the Lorenzetti brothers to Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Donatello, Botticelli and the Bellini family, and from there to Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michaelangelo and Titian, artworks will be examined together with the questions posed by research into the artistic production of the Early (c. 1400-1500) and High Renaissance (c. 1500-1520/30), especially in city centres such as Florence, Rome and Venice.


ARC 201 Samos and the East Aegean during Prehistory: Field Methodology and Archaeological Interpretation

Instructor: O. Kouka

Samos and the wider geographical area of the East Aegean, including western Asia Minor, has been the cultural link between central Anatolia and the Aegean on the one hand, and between the eastern Mediterranean and the Aegean on the other hand. The excavations of the University of Cyprus in cooperation with the German Archaeological Institute at Heraion of Samos since 2009 are the starting point of this course, which aims: a) to teach students the methodology of excavation (topographic documentation, principles of stratigraphy, documentation of architecture, daily excavation reports, sampling of various materials, dry and watersieving, etc.), b) to teach methods of cleaning, restoring, recording, drawing, photographing and studying of various categories of finds, c) to introduce students to the digital archiving of excavation data in data bases, d) to interpret excavation data and to reconstruct the prehistoric habitation at Heraion of Samos, and e) to study the cultural entity of the north and east Aegean, to which Samos also belonged from the 4th through the 2nd mill. BC. In this course can participate up to 12 students of the Department of History and Archaeology. Students have to take part for seven weeks in each excavation season. During each season, lectures on fieldwork methodology and on the Prehistory of the north and east Aegean will be given by O. Kouka and other collaborators of the project (topographer, architect, archaeobotanist, conservator, etc.). Besides, visits will take place at the Archaeological Museums of Pythagoreion and Vathy, at archaeological sites and other monuments of Samos, so that a diachronic overview of Samian cultural history can be achieved. Finally, visits are also planned to archaeological sites of western Anatolia (Ephesos, Miletus, Didyma, Clazomenai) and to neighbouring islands (Patmos, Kos, Nisyros).


ΑRC 203 War and Defence in Byzantium

Instructor: A. Vionis

This course offers an introduction to issues of war, piracy and defence in the Byzantine Empire from the age of Justinian in the 6th century to the capture of Constantinople by the Ottomans in the 15th century. The main aim is to consider such issues through the study and evaluation of archaeological remains (the symbolic and functional character of defence patterns, fortified settlements, towers and castles), written sources (about weaponry and war tactics, the relationship between organised fortification works in Byzantium, the Catholic West and the Islamic East) and pictorial art (the representation of Byzantine soldiers, warships, walled cities and towerhouses). Emphasis is given to "transitional" phases in Byzantine history (e.g. Arab and Slav raids, the Crusades, Seljuk and Ottoman attacks).


ARC 204 Gender in Byzantine Art

Instructor: M. Parani

The study of Byzantine works of art through the analytical category of gender, with the purpose of achieving a better understanding both of the works of art themselves and of the society and culture that created them. Examination of the way that Byzantine perceptions on the gender of men, women and eunuchs were expressed, shaped, advanced, criticized or idealized in Byzantine art. Tracing what it meant to be a man, a woman or a eunuch in Byzantium, through the discussion of selected Byzantine images of men, women and eunuchs, including portraits of historical figures and depictions of biblical and holy figures.


ΑRC 207 The Neolithic Period in the Aegean

Instructor: O. Kouka

Environmental studies and archaeological evidence will throw light on the Neolithic of the Aegean (6800-3200 BC), that is characterized by permanent settlements, an economy based on farming and livestock, the exchange of raw materials and products, pottery production and diversity in art. Emphasis will be given to the study of socio-economic changes that took place in the Late and in particular in the Final Neolithic to be consolidated in the Early Bronze Age (3200-2000 BC).


ΑRC 209 From Minoan Crete to Mycenaean Greece: The Aegean in the 2nd Millennium BC

Instructor: M. Iacovou

Lectures on the history of research; the foundation of the Old Palaces in Crete shortly after the inception of the second millennium BC; their politicoeconomic influence upon the rest of the Aegean and Mainland Greece; the New Palace period and the case of Acrotiri in Thera; the rise of a warrior society on the Mainland during the transition from the Middle to the Late Helladic period; Mycenaean architectural monumentality, tholos tombs and citadels; palatial scribal systems (Linear A and Linear B); destructions in the course of the 13th century BC; the post-palatial horizon.


ΑRC 214 Built Environment and Society in the Eastern Mediterranean (10th-2nd Mill. BC)

Instructor: O. Kouka

Τhe seminar focuses on the study of the built environment (settlement, sacred, funerary) in various areas of the Aegean from the Neolithic through the Late Bronze Age (7th mill.-1050 BC). The method to be applied involves the principles of "Spatial Archaeology" as defined by Clarke (1977) in order: a) to describe the main features of buildings (micro-level), b) to study the settlement organization (semi-micro level), c) to study and reconstruct relationships among settlements (macrolevel), d) to trace cult places in the Prehistoric Aegean, e) to study funerary architecture, and f) to understand the environmental, economic and social parameters that have determined the form and function of architecture, served the emerging political and social elites and led to the formation of early urban settlements (3rd mill. BC) and the establishment of the Minoan and Mycenaean palaces and towns (2nd mill. BC).


ΑRC 216 Byzantine Cyprus: Art and Archaeology (4th-12th century)

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the material culture and artistic production on Cyprus during the Byzantine period (4th c.-AD 1191) Tracing the distinctive character of this insular part of the Byzantine Empire and the factors (geographical, historical, social, financial, ideological etc) which led to its shaping. Through the selective study of the archaeological remains of the period, the following issues will be examined: a) the gradual spread of Christianity and its impact on various facets of everyday life and artistic production of the island, b) the existence and development of urban centres and their relation to their rural hinterland, c) artisanal production and commerce, and d) the dynamics of the relation of Cyprus to other regions of the Empire, especially Constantinople.


ΑRC 217 Cultural Entities in the Aegean and Western Anatolia during the Early Bronze Age (3rd Mill. BC)

Instructor: O. Kouka

The course aims at the detailed and multifaceted study of archaeological evidence and the environmental data of the 3rd ill. BC in all areas of the Aegean: Thrace, Macedonia, Mainland Greece, the Cyclades and Crete, the islands of the East Aegean and Western Anatolia. The economic, social and political aspects will be particularly emphasized in order to understand the distinctive cultural profile of each of the aforementioned areas.


ΑRC 218 The Archaeology of the Cypriote City-Kingdoms

Instructor: M. Iacovou

This course offers an analytical presentation and evaluation of archaeological data associated with sites identified as the capital centers of Cypriot polis-states that were governed by kings (basileis) The foundation horizon of the Cypriot polities during the transition from the Late Cypriot to the Early Iron Age; the climax in the Cypro-Archaic and Cypro-Classical periods; Cypriot multilingualism and the different scribal tools; monumentality (built tombs, stone and terracotta sculpture); introduction of early numismatic economy; development of extra urban sanctuaries and territorialization; commercial expansion to the east; the Ionian-Athenian network and the Cypriot kings; episodes leading to their termination after the conflict of the Successors at the end of the fourth c. BC.


ΑRC 219 Introduction to Aegean Prehistory (Stone Age – Bronze Age)

Instructor: O. Kouka

Study of the first agricultural settlements, the social organization and technology etc., of societies, that lived in the Neolithic and have set up the foundation for further cultural evolution during the Aegean Bronze Age. Study of the Bronze Age on Mainland Greece, the Cyclades, Crete, East Aegean islands and Western Anatolia. Emphasis will be given to the economic, social and political structures of the early urban sites of the East Aegean islands/Western Anatolia, of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece.


ΑRC 220 Household Pottery (Classical, Hellenistic and Roman Periods)

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The purpose of the course is twofold: a) to introduce the students to pottery studies and teach them the main methods of analysis so that they can comprehend their place in the archaeological record, and b) help them approach everyday life and household economy in its longue duree, from Classical to the Hellenistic periods.


ΑRC 221 Cyprus and the Creto-Mycenaean Aegean

Instructor: M. Iacovou

The purpose of this course is to learn to identify and work with the material indices that define the three cultures – the Cypriot, the Cretan and the Helladic in the Bronze Age - before and after they come into close contact with each other; to isolate the type of objects that are exchanged but also those that were never exchanged, and to contemplate on economic and political background of this mobility; to see that an imported object or an imported idea will almost certainly receive a new meaning and a new value in its new social environment; and to take note of main cultural indices which characterize the Mycenaean palatial era e.g. tholos tombs, wall paintings, Linear B that were not exported to Cyprus or the East Mediterranean, in order to rethink the old scenario of a Mycenaean colonization of Cyprus.


ΑRC 223 The Archaeology of Byzantine Economy

Instructor: A. Vionis

Byzantine economy and transport trade have recently become popular topics of investigation in the field of Byzantine Studies. Agricultural production in the rural provinces, the topography of cultivated lands and their relationship with neighbouring local or regional centres and towns, transport trade and commercial harbours, the processing of raw materials and luxury products, all comprise important pieces of information related to the holistic study of Byzantine economy. This course aims to identify and overview the patterns of growth and decline of the Byzantine urban and rural production and economy from the 5th to the 15th century through the evaluation of archaeological data from systematic excavations and other archaeological investigations, the study of workshops and markets, the distribution of ceramic table-wares and transport amphorae, numismatic circulation, the evaluation of information related to the processing of raw materials, the trade of silk and other fabrics.


ΑRC 224 Ancient Technology: From Raw Material to Finished Object

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The aim of the course is to introduce the students to the technology of the basic raw materials used by humans since early Prehistory namely stone, ceramics and metals, but also faience and glass. We will look at the chaine operatoire from the procurement of the raw material to its processing and to the formation of the final product.


ΑRC 225 Archaeology of Cyprus

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The course will start with a basic introduction to the geography, geology and natural environment of the island and then move on to the different archaeological periods starting with the Pre-Neolithic and concluding with the Roman period. For each period the material culture, the architecture, the social and political organization and religious and burial practices will be investigated.

ΑRC 226 The Early Prehistory of Cyprus and Anatolia (11th-3rd Mill. BC)

Instructor: O. Kouka

The course aims at the study of the Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age in the neighbouring areas of Cyprus and Anatolia. This will be achieved through the study of architecture (settlement, sacred), burial habits, lithic industries, pottery technology, metallurgy, trade-networks, cultural interaction and symbolism. Delving deeper into the above aspects aims to explain the different modes and scales that allowed an earlier and rapid cultural development in southeastern and central Anatolia and a delayed one in Western Anatolia and Cyprus in the Pre-Pottey Neolithic, the Ceramic Neolithic, the Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Age.


ΑRC 227 Fundamentals of Archaeological GeoInformatics

Instructor: A. Sarris

The course will provide an introduction to the Fundamentals of GeoInformatics and GeoSciences in Archaeology. It will cover a wide spectrum of technologies spanning from Geophysical Prospection Surveying, Aerial and Terrestrial Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Satellite Remote Sensing, and Geographical Information Systems (GIS).


ΑRC 230 Early Byzantine Cities in the Eastern Mediterranean (4th-7th Centuries)

Instructor: M. Parani

The study of the monumental topography of the cities of the Eastern provinces of the Byzantine Empire during the Early Byzantine period (4th-7th century) and their role as administrative, religious, financial and cultural centres. The examination of issues related to the urban design of Early Byzantine cities, their fortifications, provisioning, water-supply, public buildings, the zones of commercial activity as well as urban housing. Discussion of the gradual departure of Early Byzantine cities from Roman urban traditions and the subsequent transformation of their character, and tracing of the possible impact of Christianity and the centralized tendencies of the imperial administration on this development. Discussion of the so-called decline of the urban centres in the Eastern Mediterrenean during the 7th century.


ΑRC 231 Byzantine Art and Identity

Instructor: A. Vionis

The aim of this course is the exploration of "identities" in the Byzantine world and the way they are expressed through Byzantine monumental art, architecture and minor objects. Special emphasis is placed on the "identification of identity" through the visual arts, in other words, the expression of religious, political, cultural, ethnic or other identities. Moreover, the role that the Byzantine historical tradition and culture played in the construction of sociopolitical and/or cultural profiles of modern states, such as Greece, Cyprus and Turkey will be examined.


ΑRC 232 Byzantine Archaeology: From Theory to Practice

Instructor: A. Vionis

The course offers an overview of past and current methods and approaches to "Byzantine landscapes" in the Eastern Mediterranean, from the era of foreign travellers in the 19th century to today. Beyond the materiality of archaeological remains and their positivist documentation, Byzantine culture encompasses symbolic meanings and ideas. Despite the fact that Byzantine archaeology was located for long in the periphery of modern archaeological research, it has recently begun to acquire a new dimension in the international academic scene by applying methodological approaches and interpretative models borrowed from other disciplines. The aim of this course is to a) examine the interpretative approaches and advances of Byzantine archaeology in the international sphere of archaeological research, and b) to evaluate the methodological approaches that are currently followed for understanding the Byzantine material remains through the exploration of specific case-studies in Greece, Cyprus and present-day Turkey.


ΑRC 233 Art, Politics and Courtly Culture in Renaissance Italy

Instructor: M. Olympios

The course aims at familiarising students with the concept, the form and function of Italian Renaissance courts, with the distinctive culture that developed and, especially, with the artistic production linked with each one of them. The position of the court artist within the environment of the court, in close contact with his patrons (kings, dukes, counts, marquis, popes, cardinals, burgesses and the collective bodies of republican government), is examined with a view to determining the particularities of each court’s artistic preferences and the conditions that shaped them. This course offers an alternative view on the study of Italian Renaissance art to the more traditional ‘biographical’ model.


ΑRC 235 Early Netherlandish Painting (15th-16th Centuries)

Instructor: M. Olympios

This course aims at introducing students to the art of the so-called "Northern Renaissance" and, more specifically, with Netherlandish painting during the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Broader issues of interpretation and reception are tackled, while the lion’s share of the course is dedicated to the stylistic, iconographic and technical analysis of select works by the great Flemish masters. Artistic developments in the Low Countries are collated with the contemporary achievements of the Italian Renaissance and the question of the two-way relationship between these two major artistic poles is thoroughly explored.


ΑRC 236 Ancient and Byzantine Cyprus in History and Archaeology

Instructor: M. Iacovou [or other member of the Department's teaching staff]

The purpose is for the student to become acquainted with the idiosyncratic island identity of the Cypriot cultural phenomenon in the context of the Mediterranean. The objective is to acquire the tools with which to "read" the History of the Cypriots from early Prehistory to the end of the Byzantine period (1191 AD), as it is expressed in the material culture, the arts and the written sources.


ΑRC 237 Gothic Sculpture (12th-13th Centuries)

Instructor: M. Olympios

This course aims at introducing students to core historiographical issues in the study of Gothic sculpture, as it developed primarily (yet not exclusively) on the soil of what is modern-day France during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries (in some instances, tackling the material thematically leads to the analysis of later, fourteenth-century works). Even though, in its broad outline, the course favours a chronological approach, it is structured by thematic units treating not only questions of style and iconography, but also the thorny issue of the function of the various objects and structures bearing sculptural ornament, as well as that of the arrangement of the sacred space in which they lie (or once lay).


ΑRC 239 Byzantine Icon Theory and Iconoclasm

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the ideological and dogmatic background of icon worship in Byzantium during the period extending from Late Antiquity to the first decades after the Iconoclastic Controversy, through the lens of Art History. Examination of Byzantine perceptions of the character and function of icons (in the sense of all material depictions of holy figures in any artistic medium) within the framework of Orthodox Christian worship. Tracing the stages of the relevant theoretical debate since its inception during the Early Byzantine Period (4th-7th century) up until its culmination during the Iconoclastic Controversy (726/730 – 843 AD).


ARC 240 Early Byzantine Art (4th-7th Century)

Instructor: M. Parani

Overview of secular and religious art during the Early Byzantine Period (4th- 7th century). Analysis of characteristic examples, which will include works of architecture, sculpture, monumental painting (mosaics, mural paintings), iilluminated manuscripts and portable icons as well as products of the minor arts. Acquaintance with the basic characteristics and the diversity of artistic expression during the period under investigation, as well as exploration of art’s role in various aspects of public, religious and private life. Examination of the relation between Early Byzantine Art and Greek-Roman traditions on the one hand and the artistic traditions of the East on the other. Evaluation of the influence of Christianity and of the political ideology of the Byzantine Empire in the formation of the role and the character of artistic creativity during the Early Byzantine Period. Within this general framework, the examination of Cypriot monuments purports to achieve the following: a) to highlight the common elements which connect the Cypriot monuments to the broader artistic production of the period in question, and b) to trace the distinctive characteristics of local artistic expression which can be attributed to the influence of local historical circumstances and traditions.


ARC 242 Middle Byzantine Art (9th-12th Century)

Instructor: M. Parani

General overview of Middle Byzantine art, both secular and religious, from the 9th to the 12th century. Discussion of characteristic examples from various artistic media, which aims to a) highlight the diversity of artistic expression in Byzantium during the period in question, and b) examine Middle Byzantine art within its broader historical, social and cultural context.


ARC 243 Monumental Art in the Byzantine Periphery (9th-12th Century)

Instructor: M. Parani

The comparative study of architecture and monumental painting in the Byzantine periphery and specifically in Cappadocia, Byzantine Macedonia, South Italy and Cyprus. The aim of this approach is a) to trace the distinctive characteristics of artistic expression in these regions – characteristics that can be attributed to the power of local traditions and the geographical, historical and cultural context of the monuments in question, and b) to trace common features which could potentially be attributed to the assimilation of artistic trends emanating from Constantinople.


ARC 244 Traditional Culture as "Historical Archaeology"

Instructor: A. Vionis

The term "Historical Archaeology" comprises a relatively recent thing in SE Europe and the Mediterranean, and did not take long until it started being employed. However, the drawing of fixed chronological boundaries between the Middle Ages, post-medieval and early modern times has never been an easy task in the European continent. The establishment of "post-medieval Archaeology" in Britain around the middle of the 20th century, followed by other countries in Europe, has drawn the chronological horizon of Historical Archaeology in the period between the 15th and 18th centuries. The transition from a "medieval" to a more "modern" way of life and thought in connection with the gradual industrialisation of society have contributed immensely to raising awareness for the need of this new field in the archaeological discipline. The growing interest in archaeology throughout the 19th and 20th centuries and the continuous focus on issues of historical interest contributed greatly to the formation of Historical Archaeology, to its holistic approach, as well as to new directions in the study of the material culture of early modern European and Mediterranean societies. The aim of this course is to provide a thorough review and understanding of the different aspects of material culture in the Mediterranean region and an introduction to its multi-faceted expression. Landscape archaeology, settlement evolution, aspects of material culture (e.g. from monuments and public buildings to humble household artefacts) comprise the main thematic units that are explored in the framework of this course and under the prism of historical, social and cultural changes.


ARC 245 Late Byzantine Art (13th-15th Century)

Instructor: M. Parani

General overview of Late Byzantine Art, both secular and ecclesiastical, from the 13th to the 15th century. Discussion of characteristic examples in various artistic media which aims to a) highlight the diversity of artistic expression in the Byzantine world during the period in question, and b) examine Late Byzantine art within its broader historical, social and cultural context. Analysis of the phenomemon of the impact of Late Byzantine Art beyond the political borders of the Empire, which is contrasted to the dramatic retreat of the political and military power of the Byzantine Empire during the period in question. Examination of the relationship between Byzantine art and the art of Western Europe (Late Midieval Period, Early Renaissance Period).


ARC 246 Archaeological Field Methodology: Byzantine Cyprus

Instructor: A. Vionis

The goals of this course are the following: a) the introduction of students to archaeological field methods and techniques for conducting landscape research (archaeological surface survey), b) the review of different approaches to the built environment of Cyprus, and c) the evaluation of published research and results concerning the Byzantine/Medieval urban and rural landscapes of Cyprus.


ARC 247 Byzantine Archaeology of the Aegean Islands

Instructor: A. Vionis

The Aegean islands (e.g. the Cyclades, the Dodecanese) nowadays comprise popular destinations for many European and overseas tourists, leading to the complete "touristisation" of an island/traditional way of life. The aforementioned process brought about social, economic and environmental transformations which prevent us from sketching how life was like on the islands in pre-modern times. This course examines the archaeology of islands as a means through which we can shed light on the Aegean "insular" societies of the pre-industrial past. Everyday life and societies on most of the Aegean islands were shaped on the basis of their geographical position along maritime trade routes and within the periphery of different empires diachronically. Thus, the present course aims at examining a) how Byzantine, Latin and early Ottoman domination shaped island societies, b) how Orthodox-Christian Aegean communities perceived the existence of their closest "metropolitan centre" on each occasion (e.g. Constantinople, Venice, Istanbul), c) what kind of archaeological data can be explored in order to trace group identities on the islands, d) the role that monumental art played in shaping island societies and their cultural identity, e) what the economic standing of the Aegean islands was in periods of crises and war, and f) the role that island dress and elite material culture played in shaping island identity. These are the main topics through which the archaeology and character of the Aegean islands in Byzantine times will be explored.


ARC 248 The Archaeology of Byzantine "Expression"

Instructor: A. Vionis

The Byzantine world, very much like any other society from early Prehistory to today, consisted of "symbols" and "expressions", both collective and individual. Constantinople, for example, a mega-city with elaborate churches and palaces, mirrored its symbols of imperial power and diachronic history onto the memory of its inhabitants. The emperor himself comprised an expression of "ecumenical power" within the empire and beyond, through a series of symbolic references in various forms of art. The main objective of this course is the study of imperial ideology and the multiple "expressions" and "identities" of the Byzantine emperor, his political and symbolic power in the Byzantine world, recognised through the study and interpretation of the written record and the iconography of works of art and illuminated manuscripts.


ARC 249 Communication and Exchange Networks during the Early Byzantine Period (4th-7th Century)

Instructor: M. Parani

Overview of the archaeological and written evidence regarding the systematic circulation of goods, people and information within the borders of the Eastern Roman Empire (what was later to become the Byzantine Empire) and between the Empire and other regions from the 4th to the 7th century AD. Study of geographic distribution of raw materials and artefacts. Examinations of issues regarding a) infrastructure, mechanisms of production and circulation of goods and raw materials, b) motives – political, financial, personal – which led to these exchanges, c) the different categories of people engaged in these exchanges, and d) the financial consequences as well as the cultural impact of these contacts for all parties involved.


ARC 250 Αrchaeometry

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

Archaeometry, a field also broadly described with the term "Archaeological Sciences", is the study of ancient material culture with the use of a variety of physical and chemical techniques in order to reveal information regarding their structure, the chemical composition, their provenance and their date. Although initially archaeometry was connected mostly with absolute dating techniques, this is no longer the case, as it encompasses many more fields and topics of research which employ physical and chemical techniques in order to answer important archaeological and historical questions. This course is a basic introduction to the methodology and the techniques used in archaeological sciences.


ARC 253 Ancient Technology

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the technology of the basic raw materials used by humans since early Prehistory, namely stone, ceramics and metals but also faience and glass. We will look at the chaine operatoire from the procurement of the raw material to its processing and to the formation of the final product.


ARC 255 Ancient Metallurgy

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The aim of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the development and spread of mining and metallurgy within their geological and archaeological contexts.


ARC 256 The Emergence of the Bronze Age: Anatolia and Cyprus in the 4th and 3rd Mill. BC

Instructor: O. Kouka

During the 4th and the 3rd mill. BC major economic and social changes take place in the Eastern Mediterranean, that can be easily traced in the archaeological records. These changes can be primarily observed in the metallurgical knowhow, i.e. bronze alloys, in ceramic technology with the introduction of the potter’s wheel, in the emergence of settlements with early urban structures, in the erection of the first palaces (Arslantepe), as well as the emergence of complex land- and sea-trade networks. The detailed study of the aforementioned cultural components in Anatolia and Cyprus will demonstrate the mechanisms that led to a rapid or caused a slow economic, social and political development and therefore to a different cultural profile of the neighbouring regions of Anatolia and Cyprus in the 4th and 3rd mill. BC.


ARC 257 The Bible in Byzantine Art

Instructor: M. Parani

The study and comprehension of the creative processes and the iconography of Byzantine figural art with Christian content, from its origins down to the Late Byzantine Period, through the study of depictions inspired by the Bible. Through the study of characteristic examples, primarily from the media of monumental painting and manuscript illumination, acquaintance with the most popular biblical themes selected for depiction in Byzantium and the Biblical narratives that inspired them. Analysis of the relationship between image and Biblical text, for the purpose of understanding better the creative processes of Christian iconography. Discussion of the factors that led to the selection of specific Biblical themes for depiction in specific artistic media; exploration of the way in which the emphasis and the manner of depiction shift from one period to the next in response to the changing needs of the faithful, current theological debates and liturgical developments, and the roles that the Church in general and religious art in particular had to fulfil.


ARC 259 Byzantine Metalwork

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the different aspects of production, circulation and use of metal objects during the Byzantine period through the testimony of archaeology, the written sources and artistic representations. Examination of issues relevant to the supply of raw materials, the establishment and organization of workshops, manufacturing and decorative techniques, the distribution and commerce of metal objects, their typology and their role in various aspects of public, religious and private life in Byzantium.


ARC 263 Everyday Life in Byzantium

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with different facets of everyday life and material culture in Byzantium from the 9th century onwards through the examination of archaeological data, written sources and artistic representations. Special topics pertain to a) the individual (dress and jewelry), b) the Byzantine house (domestic architecture, furniture and furnishings), c) health and and care for the body (diet and table-wares, baths and their equipment, hospitals and their equipment), d) agriculture and artisanal production, and (e) care and protection for the soul (personal piety, magic).


ARC 264 Byzantine Glyptics

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the products of Byzantine glyptics (ivory, steatite, precious and semi-precious stones) through a selection of representative examples. Examination of their typology, their manufacturing and decorative techniques, iconography and style. Study of the economic and social dimensions of their production (e.g supply of raw materials, production centres and workshops, hierarchy of materials, patrons, users, the role of these objects as means of displaying wealth, social standing, and spirituality, reception). Through the discussion of specific examples, examination of issues relevant to imperial ideology and propaganda, personal piety, magic, the phenomenon of "renaissances" in Byzantine art, the survival of mythological themes, Byzantine humour, and, not least, the sources of inspiration, artistic archetypes and foreign influences.


ARC 266 Methodological and Interpretative Approaches in Aegean Prehistory

Instructor: O. Kouka

Methodology of archaeological excavations in the Aegean from Schliemann’s excavations at Troy onwards. Study of interpretative approaches in Archaeology (Traditional, New or Processual Archaeology, Post-Processual Archaeology) and application on the archaeological evidence of Prehistoric Aegean. Contribution of Archaeometry to the interpretation of archaeological data.


ARC 269 Post-Byzantine Art (1453-19th Century)

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the architecture, both secular and religious, as well as with the painting (monumental painting and portable icons) in the centuries that followed the Fall of Constantinople. Investigation of the circumstances and the factors which led to the survival of the Byzantine tradition and to the adherence of the enslaved Greek-Orthodox populations to the expressive means of Byzantine art.


ARC 271 Ships and Ports of the Classical Times: Iconography and Types

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of ships and harbours in antiquity, from the Early Iron Age to the Hellenistic period, so that they discover the archaeology of sea-trade and naval activities within their historical context and understand better these key elements of ancient economy.


ARC 272 The Maritime Tradition of Cyprus during Antiquity

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The course objective is to convey to the students a comprehensive and documented overview of the role that Cyprus played in the international maritime context of the Eastern Mediterranean throughout antiquity, from the Prehistoric to the Medieval period.


ARC 273 Ships, Ports and Trade during the Byzantine Period

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The purpose of the course is to teach the students the main developments in maritime activities (commercial and military) throughout the Byzantine period, so that they perceive their impact on important historical events and socio-political changes of the period.


ARC 274 Sea Travels in Antiquity

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The main purpose of the course is to teach the students a holistic approach to sea traveling in antiquity, as an exploration, battle or trade venture, though written accounts and material remains.


ARC 275 Romanesque Art (11th-12th Centuries)

Instructor: M. Olympios

This course offers a survey of artistic production in western Europe (France, Italy, Spain, England, the German lands) during the Romanesque period (eleventh-twelfth centuries). The main emphasis is on the monumental arts (architecture, sculpture, painting) while manuscript illumination and metalwork are also touched upon. The course’s main goal is to instruct students about a fundamental period in the history of European art and of European culture in general.


ARC 276 Ancient Cyprus: From Prehistory to the Roman Era

Instructor: M. Iacovou

The primary goal of the course is twofold: a) to introduce students to the history of research on the Archaeology of Cyprus, i.e. how, when and by whom did archaeology develop into a field of research on the island of Cyprus in relation to the investigation/excavation of specific sites; b) to provide the student with a solid, yet simplified, understanding of the social, economic and political developments that led to the definition of the island’s successive cultural horizons in antiquity.


ARC 278 Big Discoveries in the Prehistoric Aegean

Instructor: O. Kouka

Exploration of the culture that emerged in Prehistory (Stone Age – Bronze Age) in the Aegean through the biggest discoveries of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.


ARC 282 Byzantine Culture (5th-15th C.)

Instructor: A. Vionis

This course offers an introduction to the study of secular culture from the Byzantine period and the era of Latin colonisation to the beginning of the Ottoman domination in mainland Greece, the Aegean islands, Asia Minor and Cyprus. The aim is to reconstruct everyday reality and aspects of daily life in Byzantine cities and the countryside through the evaluation of archaeological, visual and textual evidence. Different aspects of Byzantine culture and life will be explored, namely a) the transition from "Greco-Roman" polytheism to "Byzantine" Christianity, b) the Christian attitude towards death (religion and death, burial and burial customs), c) professions and professionals (pastoralism, agriculture, trade), d) economic patterns at village level and the relation between local centres and their immediate rural hinterland (industry, trade and consumption), e) settlement evolution in the countryside (from Byzantine villages to fortified settlements of the period of Latin domination), f) domestic material culture and life (housing architecture, household utensils, diet), g) relationship between "locals" and "newcomers" (Greco-Byzantines, Slavs, Franks/Latins, Ottomans), and h) leisure activities (hunting, music and dance, festivals and games).


ARC 285 Methods and Techniques of Archaeological Fieldwork, Terrestrial and Underwater

Instructors: S. Demesticha, A. Vionis, M. Iacovou, O. Kouka

This course aims at introducing the students to archaeological fieldwork, with emphasis on survey, excavation and artefacts documentation. The main methodologies and tools are explained in the classroom, with examples of the most important case studies. The main objective is to help the students understand the distinctive features of archaeological fieldwork as they are implemented in different environments, on land and under the water. An important component of the course is the practical training that provides the opportunity to practice basic skills in site plotting, artefact photography and drawing as well as in record keeping and data management.


ARC 286 Early Seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The purpose of the course is to introduce the students to the concept of maritime landscape, with a focus on the archaeological record (iconography, sites, mobile finds) through which the development of seafaring can be traced in the Mediterranean, from its emergence until the Late Bronze Age.


ARC 287 Αrchaeology of Death: Burial Habits in the Eastern Mediterranean (11th-3rd Mill. BC)

Instructor: O. Kouka

The "Archaeology of Death" is one of the most exciting approaches to the study of prehistoric societies. Field methods for the excavation and documentation of funerary buildings, cemeteries and/or individual graves, the categorization of data referring to grave typology and the variability of burial practices, as well as the verification of indications for funerary and postfunerary ceremonies (e.g. cult of crania-cult of the ancestors) to be studied in this course will allow the penetration into the cognitive and emotional sphere of Eastern Mediterranean societies (Levant, Anatolia, Cyprus, Aegean) and the interpretation of the management of death from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic to the end of the Early Bronze Age.


ARC 289 Ancient Greek Architecture

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

Architecture is one of the main fields of research in Classical Archeology. Ancient Greek monuments, religious, public and private buildings, in civic environments, sanctuaries, and public places, gave shape and form to the space of ancient Greek history. The course will follow the evolution of ancient Greek architecture and the development of the three great orders, the Doric, the Ionic and the Corinthian, in the Mainland, the islands, the coast of Asia Minor and in Magna Grecia. At the center of these enquiries stands the Greek temple and its role in the political and social organization of Greek cities. Apart from the temples, other architectural types such as theaters, stoas, private houses and funerary buildings, defensive architecture and urban planning will be examined. The Acropolis and the Agora in Athens, as well as buildings in the Panhellenic sanctuaries (mainly Delphi and Olympia) will be discussed, among others, in order to demonstrate the relationship of architecture with ancient Greek history, politics and economy.


ARC 290 Gods, Heroes and Men in Attic Vase Painting

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

Despite its humble material, Attic Black-figure and Red-figure vase painting is one of the best studied categories of Greek art of the Archaic and Classical periods. This is due not only to the high quality and abundance of Attic vases of these periods, or to the diversity of their shapes and decorative themes. It is rather due to their importance in studying one of the most interesting phenomena of antiquity, namely the emergence of the city of Athens as one of the most important artistic and political centers of the ancient Greek world. In addition, Attic vase painting seems to reflect the works of Great painting that have been permanently lost to us. Vase paintings offer us some insight into the paintings admired by the ancient writers. The reappearance of the image and pictorial compositions in Athens of the 8th c. after a gap of at least three centuries, had already offered most of the subjects of Greek vase painting, mainly related to men and their anthropomorphic gods. Already from the 7th century onwards, vase painters cared to depict the human form in various ways and to select their themes from both daily life and, above all, from the world of myth, allowing us to examine issues such as the ancient Greek religion and cults, mythology and rituals, everyday life, ancient Greek theater, etc.


ARC 291 Topography of Athens

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

The course examines the monuments of ancient Athens from prehistoric to Roman times, focusing on the Archaic and Classical periods. The evaluation of the monuments is not based only on topographical and typological observations, but also on the recording of historical contexts, their associations with people and the political or economic circumstances that created them. The Acropolis, the Agora, the Kerameikos, the sanctuaries and cemeteries inside and outside Athens are discussed in relation with the ancient history of this area and in association with other facets, such as literature and philosophy, or even Athens' foreign policy. The course also records the public, religious and private life of ancient Athenians, as revealed through the monuments. Athenian sculptors and painters, vase painters and architects, poets and writers, politicians and orators, historians and philosophers, craftsmen, merchants and warriors are being examined in close association with the monuments, sources and inscriptions that outline the evolution of the city-state of Athens.


ARC 292 Applications of GeoInformatics in Archaeology

Instructor: A. Sarris

The course aims to introduce students to the applications of Geomatics in Archaeology. It will present an overview of the terrestrial subsurface mapping techniques, aerial and satellite remote sensing.


ARC 294 Cyclades and the East Aegean: Cultural Complexity from the Early through the Late Bronze Age

Instructor: O. Kouka

The Cyclades, the islands of the east Aegean and Western Anatolia, due to their geographic location and geomorphological particularity, constituted cultural microregions of crucial importance during the early and later Prehistory. The study of the natural environment and resourses in the above regions, the spatial organization, settlement planning, as well as of various categories of artefacts and raw materials (clay, stone, semi-precious stones, metals etc.) will contribute to outline the cultural physiognomy of the aforementioned regions and to trace trade routes, interaction and antagonism between settlements and/or geographical regions in order to demonstrate cultural complexity in the Cyclades and the East Aegean from the Early through the Late Bronze Age (3200-1050 BC).


ARC 297 Greek Sanctuaries

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

Greek Sanctuaries are one of the most important aspects of the ancient Mediterranean world. They do not just stand as the places in which the Greeks expressed their religiosity through myths and rituals; they rather represent the places where social and political consciousness and identities were forged. From their earliest phases, they were inexorably linked to the history of the Greek cities. Activities like athletic contests, sacrifices and votive offering nurtured a Greek identity and made the sanctuaries into places of social competition and display of economic and political power.


ARC 298 Sculpture of the Archaic and Classical Period

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

Sculpture was one of the main arts of the ancient Greek world. Already from its beginnings, it was connected with sacred and public matters, as it gave the temples their cult statues and sculptural embellishments, the sanctuaries their votive offerings, and the tombs their tomb markers. The search for monumentality already in the Archaic period, if not earlier, and the quests set by sculptors removed their works from their archaic phase and created the sculpture of the classical period. That is why it has been preferred to examine the two periods together and to present some of the great sculptors and their works, to evaluate the testimonies of the written sources and of the inscriptions engraved on these works, in order to understand the messages they carried for their contemporaries, and their correlations with historical circumstances.

 

 

[Back to Top]


 

 

I.3 SEMINARS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (6th – 8th Semester)

 

 

ARC 304 The Archaeology of the Cypriot Bronze Age (3rd and 2nd Mill. BC)

Instructor: M. Iacovou

The course aims to inform students about the striking developments that have been taking place since the last two decades of the 20th century regarding the interpretation of the social and economic transformations, which took place in the second half of the 3rd millennium - especially in the course of the Philia cultural episode, when Vasilia on the north coast of Cyprus appears to have become the island’s first gateway - and also during the 2nd millennium BC to the end of the Cypriote Bronze Age.


ARC 305 The Byzantine City, 5th-15th C.

Instructor: A. Vionis

The study of the evolution of the Byzantine city has intensified over the past few years by contemporary scholarship, while several interesting interpretative theories have been put forward, concerning the survival of the city in the early Byzantine period, its transformation during the "transitional" era and its gradual revival throughout the Middle and Late Byzantine period. The main objective of the course is the examination of the Byzantine city’s structure and evolution from the 5th to the 15th century. The character of the "city’" in the early Byzantine period, the forces that transformed its characteristic from "polytheistic" to "Christian", the prerequisites for the preservation of the city, its evolution throughout the period of transformations in the 7th-9th centuries, the role of forts and fortified towns in the 10th-13th centuries and how the density of the urban built space is translated, constitute the main topics under investigation.


ARC 306 Polities, Urbanization and Internationalism: Cyprus in the Late Bronze Age

Instructor: M. Iacovou

The transition from the Middle to the Late Cypriot: a settlement pattern transformation that leads to the formation of chains of interconnected settlement sites and to the development of economic regions. The foundation of Cyprus’s international harbor sites primarily on the east and south coasts (e.g. Enkomi, Hala Sultan Tekke, Paphos). The new wealth that begins to appear in the form of imported luxury objects in chamber tombs, which in the case of the newly established harbor sites, in particular, are constructed within the settlement and not in communal burial sites. Extensive evidence pointing to the specialization of craftsmen as well as settlements within each region in the name of conducting with success the heavy industry of copper procurement and copper export.


ARC 307 The Topography of Constantinople

Instructor: M. Parani

The study of the monumental topography of Constantinople from its foundation in 324 until its fall in 1453. The main stages of the urban development of the Byzantine capital are highlighted through the study of written sources and material remains, while the factors that impacted the formation and development of its monumental physiognomy are also examined. These include geomorphology and the natural environment, the changing historical conditions and their impact on the demographic and economic state of the city, the demands of the imperial government and of imperial ceremonial, and the needs, both material and spiritual, of its inhabitants.


ARC 308 Byzantine Burial: Art and Ideology

Instructor: A. Vionis

The aim of this seminar is to examine aspects related to burials and burial practices in the Byzantine world, but also related to the perception of death and its (direct or indirect) reference in Byzantine art. Archaeological evidence, monumental art and Byzantine textual references will be explored in order to analyze and interpret burial practices and related beliefs within the sphere of Byzantine culture.


ARC 315 Island Archaeology: Island Societies in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Aegean

Instructor: O. Kouka

The Aegean Sea depicts one of the richest archipelagos of the Mediterranean. The Aegean islands have attracted humans already from the beginnings of the Holocene. Nevertheless, they were not systematically inhabited before the Neolithic (6800-3200 BC). This Sea became later, in the Early Bronze Age (3200-1050 BC), the water zone that was connecting Mainland Greece with Anatolia and Crete with the southern Aegean and northern Greece, the southern Balkans and the Black Sea, becoming in that way a field of intensive economic, social and cultural fermentation. The main goals of the seminar are: a) the study of the theoretical approaches of "Island Archaeology", which has been investigating the mechanisms of island colonization by humans since the early 1970s, the phases of cultural evolution of island societies and their partıcularity in comparison with socities living on big mainlands, b) the study of the conditions and beginnings of colonization of small and big islands and island complexes of the Aegean (location-distance, size, geomorphology, resources), and c) the study and interpretation of aspects of island cultures (settlement history, economy, social stucture, cultural interaction) in the Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age.


ARC 318 Aegean of Multiple Speeds: From the Neolithic Household to the Minoan Palaces

Instructor: O. Kouka

Τhe geographical and environmental variability of the Aegean, as well as the diversity of building materials, led to the creation of different architectural structures from the Neolithic to the beginning of the Middle Bronze Age (7th-beginning of 2nd mill. BC). The study of these structures will be undertaken under the methodological principles of "Spatial Archaeology", as defined by Clarke (1977), in order: a) to describe the main features of buildings/houses/households (microlevel), b) to study the settlement organization (semi-micro level), c) to study and reconstruct relationships among settlements (macrolevel), d) to understand environmental, economic and social parameters that have determined the form and function of architecture, served the emerging political and social elites and led to the formation of early urban settlements (3rd mill. BC) and the establishment of the Minoan palaces (ca. 1900 BC). This investigation will clarify the cultural diversity of the Prehistoric Aegean in place and time.


ARC 319 Art and Society in Cyprus and Anatolia (Neolithic-Chalcolithic-Early Bronze Age)

Instructor: O. Kouka

The neighbouring location of Cyprus and Anatolia in the Eastern Mediterranean led since the mid 11th mill. BC to cultural interaction between the two regions. This interaction is visible in the material culture (built environment, pottery, small finds), which reflects the choices of the societies who created it. The seminar aims at the critical study of art (architecture, stone working, sculpture, pottery, metallurgy, etc.) of these two regions in terms of their geomorphology, climate and geology, the decipherment of social parameters that led to the creation of art, as well as the comparative study of social aspects of the societies, which lived in Cyprus and Anatolia in the Neolithic, Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Periods.


ARC 320 Built Environment and Society in the Prehistoric Aegean

Instructor: O. Kouka

Τhe seminar focuses on the study of the built environment (settlement, sacred, funerary) in various areas of the Aegean from the Neolithic through the Late Bronze Age (7th mill.-1050 BC). The method to be applied involves the principles of "Spatial Archaeology" as defined by Clarke (1977) in order to: a) describe the main features of buildings (micro-level), b) study the settlement organization (semi-micro level), c) study and reconstruct relationships among settlements (macrolevel), d) trace cult places in the Prehistoric Aegean, e) study funerary architecture, f) understand the environmental, economic and social parameters that have determined the form and function of architecture, served the emerging political and social elites and led to the formation of early urban settlements (3rd mill. BC) and the establishment of the Minoan and Mycenaean palaces and towns (2nd mill. BC).


ARC 321 The Cyclades and Crete during Prehistory

Instructor: O. Kouka

The insular particularity, the geographical location and the resources of the Cyclades (obsidian, metals, emery, marble) and Crete led to the exploration (Palaeolithic-Μesolithic) and later to the colonization (Neolithic-Early Bronze Age) by human groups deriving from the big mainlands of Greece and Anatolia, which together with the islands display one of the most complicated cultural fields of the Prehistoric Mediterranean. This seminar aims to study: a) the theoretical principles of "Island Archaeology", which since the 1970s has been studying the reasons and process of island colonization, the evolution of insular cultures and their differences from their contemporary cultures of mainlands, b) the beginnings of colonization of the Cyclades and Crete (Stone Age), the settlement schemes and the inter-site structure of settlements from the Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age to the Minoan palaces and their territories in the Middle and Late Bronze Age, c) aspects of economy, social structure, arts and crafts and symbolism, and d) intercultural contacts between the Cyclades and Crete and their contribution to the emergence of the Aegean Prehistoric culture.


ARC 324 The Archaeology of the Cypriot City-Kingdoms in the First Millennium BC.

Instructor: M. Iacovou

In depth study of the history of research and of the methodological problems; assessment of the difficulties born from the extremely limited spatial and temporal extent of field research invested in the Cypriot polities of the Iron Age. The significance of the recently employed landscape archaeology in the study of the polis and the chora of the Cypriot Iron Age polities. Update on theoretical approaches regarding the formation of political organizations and political economies in the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.


ARC 327 Geometric Greece

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

Geometric Greece forms one of the most important fields of research in Aegean archeology. Some of the most significant phenomena of Greek history, such as the adoption of the Phoenician alphabet for the recording of the Greek language, the systematic contacts with the eastern and western Mediterranean and the Second colonization movement, the introduction of images and representations into Greek art, the emergence of the Panhellenic sanctuaries and of monumental architecture, the Hero cults, the Epics, and, as a culmination, the establishment of the City-States, that shaped Greek culture for the following centuries, appear in this period. However, no examination of Geometric Greece can ignore the two preceding periods: the Submycenaean (c. 1100/1070-1050/1020 BC); and the Protogeometric (c. 1050/1020-900 BC). The crisis years in the Eastern Mediterranean around 1200 BC and the collapse of the Mycenaean palatial systems, are associated with new phenomena, such as the absence of a writing system, the decline in population and wealth, and the loss of some technological knowledge, have been seen by many as adequate indications of a "dark age". Recent excavations have lifted this "darkness", and the latest research attempts to illuminate Geometric Greece and to document its history.


ARC 328 Parthenon and Its Times

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

Among the most discussed monuments of the ancient world, the Parthenon continues to generate discussions, questions, and university courses. Its architecture and sculptural decoration often serve as a reference point for many discussions about Greek art. Its relatively good preservation, despite its troubled history, the ancient testimonies about its importance and date, and the superb quality of its architectural and sculptural work, have placed the Parthenon at the center of classical art. However, admiration has to be accompanied by scientific evidence. The study of the Parthenon can be made more complete if this monument is treated not individually as a building of the Athenian Acropolis, but as part of the artistic and political developments in Athens of the 5th century BC. All monuments of the Athenian Acropolis of the second half of the 5th century express the perception of Athens, and of being an Athenian, by Athenian architects, sculptors and craftsmen, politicians and citizens.


ARC 329 Topography of Delphi and Olympia

Instructor: G. Papasavvas

The seminar focuses on exploring issues concerning the two great Panhellenic sanctuaries, those of Apollo at Delphi and of Zeus in Olympia, and follows their evolution through time, not just via their architectural development and the presentation of the relevant monuments, but mainly through the study of issues such as, for example, the problem of cult continuity from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age, the acquaintance of the Greeks with the imported works from the East that ended up as votives in Greek sanctuaries, the pursuit of political motivations in the construction of buildings within these sanctuaries, the political and other motivations behind the dedication of expensive offerings, conspicuous display, etc.


ARC 330 Landscapes and Objects in Byzantium

Instructor: A. Vionis

The course aims at exploring systematically different aspects of culture in the Byzantine period and the era of Latin colonisation (until the early period of Ottoman domination) in mainland Greece, the Aegean islands, Asia Minor and Cyprus. The main aim is to reconstruct daily affairs in cities and the countryside mainly through the evaluation of archaeological evidence, as well as through the exploration of the visual arts and the textual record.


ARC 331 Iconographic Programmes of Middle Byzantine Churches

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the most important surviving ensembles of monumental religious painting, which were created in the lands of the Byzantine Empire during the period that begins with the end of the Iconoclastic Controversy (AD 843) and ends with the Fall of Constantinople to the Crusaders in AD 1204. Comprehension of the content and the function of Middle Byzantine iconographic programmes within the space of the church and examination of the factors that impacted their configuration.


ARC 332 El Greco: The Man and His Times

Instructor: M. Olympios

This seminar aspires to introduce students to the life and work of Domenikos Theotokopoulos, better known today as El Greco (1541-1614). His astounding career began in Candia’s famed workshops of icon painting, in Venetian Crete, only to continue (possibly) in the bottega of Titian (Tiziano Vecelli) in Venice and, under the aegis of Cardinal Alessanro Farnese and (later) the painters’ guild in Rome, and end up in Toledo, Spain, where he produced his most widely recognized and groundbreaking work. His transformation from a Post-Byzantine painter into one of the most original and unique artists of Late Renaissance Europe constitutes a major landmark in the History of Art and has been fruitfully discussed in the course of many a scholarly gathering and other international events. Through this course, students discover the significance of Theotokopoulos’ work for the history of European art and witness its impact on the Cretan’s contemporary and later colleagues.


ARC 334 Dress and Adornment in Byzantium

Instructor: M. Parani

Acquaintance with the typology, the development, usage and symbolism of the secular, ecclesiastical and monastic dress in Byzantium. Examination of how different aspects of individual and collective identity in Byzantium were constructed and displayed through the choice and adoption of specific garments and jewellery.


ARC 347 Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Pottery in the Eastern Mediterranean

Instructor: A. Vionis

The course constitutes an introduction to the basic types of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine ceramic table- and common-wares in the Eastern Mediterranean (5th-19th c. AD). Emphasis is given to basic issues of pottery typology and chronology, as well as to the interpretation of changes in technology, trade and use of ceramic vessels (both within as well as outside the Byzantine house). The course is focused on the geographical region of mainland Greece and the Aegean islands, Cyprus and western Asia Minor, with special references to ceramic production in Italy and the influences it exerted on the local production in the Eastern Mediterranean.


ARC 352 The Application of Natural Sciences in the Study of the Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The course is divided into different chapters, each of which focuses on an area of archaeological sciences applied in the study of Antiquity. These are absolute dating, recording and discovery of archaeological sites, the interdisciplinary study of ceramics, the interdisciplinary study of metallurgical remains, the interdisciplinary study of metalwork, and provenance studies.


ARC 354 The Production and Trade of Metals in the Bronze Age

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the technology of production of metals in the Bronze Age, but also to the organization of the networks through which they were traded.


ARC 355 Copper-Metallurgy, Metalwork and Trade in Antiquity

Instructor: V. Kassianidou

The course's purpose is to teach students about the history of copper production and trade in Antiquity, starting with the earliest phases until the Roman period.


ARC 361 Amphorae: History, Use and Interpretation

Instructor: S. Demesticha

The main purpose of the seminar is to help students understand the production and trade mechanisms in Antiquity through the study of the maritime transport containers and teach them the necessary skills for the identification and interpretation of transport amphorae, dated from the Late Bronze Age to the Roman period.


ARC 362 Architecture and Identity in the Latin East (12th-17th Centuries)

Instructor: M. Olympios

The course aims at examining the "identities" of the people responsible for shaping the architectural landscape of the Latin East, as well as those of its users, to place the monuments in question in the context of the social circumstances of the era that produced them. For the purposes of the present course, the Latin East is defined geographically as occupying modern-day Greece, Cyprus, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Israel and chronologically as extending from the twelfth to the seventeenth century. In this broad geographical and chronological framework, the Crusader Eastern Mediterranean harboured intricate and complex societies characterized by internal linguistic, ethnic and creedal differences, which tended to grow less acute with the passage of time, leading to extraordinarily intriguing phenomena of interchange and fusion. This course aspires to the examination of these socio-historical phenomena through the lens of the period’s rich architectural heritage.


ARC 363 Art in Lusignan and Venetian Cyprus (1192-1571)

Instructor: M. Olympios

This course aims to examine the art of Cyprus during the Lusignan and Venetian periods (1192-1571). The emergence of Cyprus as an independent kingdom in the wake of the Third Crusade (1189-1191) gave rise to a wealth of political, demographic, social and other changes, which shaped its distinctive identity and the role the island played in the history of the Eastern Mediterranean during the Late Middle Ages. The loss of lands under Christian control on the coast of Latin Syria in the course of the thirteenth century, the calamities of the fourteenth century and more intensive contact with the Greco-Venetian world during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries brought about considerable demographic and social upheaval on the island, which ranged from the influx of Frankish, Syrian or other refugee populations to the rise of new houses, both local and foreign, to the higher social echelons. The dynamic that developed between the various religious and ethnic groups co-existing on Cypriot soil – the numerically small Latin elite, the populous Greek community, but also Syrians, Maronites, Armenians, Copts, Jews, Muslims and others – offers a compelling and productive framework for approaching the island’s artistic production. The course focuses on monumental architecture, sculpture and painting, as well as metalwork, textiles and other aspects of the material culture of medieval Cyprus, in conjunction with the testimony of the textual sources, in an attempt to reconstruct the mental processes and the particular conditions that led to the creation of the surviving works, and to highlight what these can reveal about the quotidian interchanges having occurred between these communities throughout this turbulent period.


ARC 370 Computer Applications in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Instructor: A. Sarris

This course aims to give students of History and Archaeology a theoretical base and practical training in topics concerning the application of information technologies in the Humanities. The course will focus on familiarizing students with specific software dealing with the analysis, processing and visualization of data which they may need to manage in the future, either at work or in an academic environment. The goal of this course is to provide practical knowledge for the statistical analysis of measurements, creation of charts and thematic maps, the visualization of spatio-temporal associations and networks, the analysis of digital texts and literature, etc.


ARC 388 Art and Ritual in Byzantine Cyprus (7th-12th C.)

Instructor: M. Parani

Byzantine art is a form of artistic expression with a primarily religious character, which aimed to serve the needs of the Christian faith whether in the context of public liturgical worship or as an expression of personal piety and devotion towards God and the Saints. Within the framework of this seminar are examined the various forms of artistic expression that were developed in Cyprus from the 7th and up to the 12th century with the aim of serving the religious and spiritual needs of the faithful, be they laymen, monks or members of the clergy.

 

 

[Back to Top]

 



 

 

 II.1 INTRODUCTORY COURSES IN HISTORY - COMPULSORY (1st-3rd Semester)

 

 

HIS 105 Introduction to the Historical Studies, the Philosophy and Methodology of History

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

As an introduction to historical studies, this course will discuss what history as a discipline entails, as well as the main parameters/factors associated with the approaches to history. It consists of two parts: the theory and the practice of history. The former will involve familiarizing students with all the main questions and issues concerning historians as well as the theoretical framework within which historians approach their materials (e.g.: how do we define and understand historical time; what are historical sources; what are the aims of history; what is the role of historians; what is and how one constructs a historical argument; what are the historical schools of thought and how does each approach history on the basis of their ideology etc.) The practical part relates to the manner in which a historian thinks and acts and the skills that he/she needs in order to exercise his/her discipline. In this context, the course will contribute to the development of students’ critical thinking skills, the par excellence skill necessary for the subject of history. a historian. The course will also train students in the reading and interpretation of historical sources, in identifying and critiquing a historical argument, as well as constructing and supporting their own argument, in the writing of a historical essay, in the making of a presentation etc.

 

HIS 108 Introduction to Modern Greek History

Instructor: D. Kontogeorgis

The course aims to introduce the students to Modern Greek history from the late Ottoman period until the Goudi military coup (end of the 18th century-1909). The course intends to address the political developments that led to the establishment of the Greek State and its institutions (the 1821 Greek Revolution, king Otto’s ascendance to power, the 1862 constitution etc). Moreover, it will elaborate on both Greece’s economic development and social realities (e.g. migration). The main focus of the course lies in the historical evolution of the Greek state. The study of the Greek diaspora will also be briefly analyzed.

 

HIS 112 Introduction to Byzantine History

Instructor: D. Stathakopoulos

The course aims to familiarize students with the history of the Byzantine empire from 330 to 1453. Following a chronological approach, we will survey the long and complex history of this resilient state that underwent many crises but managed to successfully adapt to the changing geopolitical, socio-economic and cultural landscape around it. We will follow this state from its roots in the late Roman empire, through rivalries with enemies from the East (Persians, Arabs, Seljuq and Ottoman Turks), the West (Goths, Lombards, Franks, Normans and Italians) and the North (Slavs, Bulgars, Rus, Serbs). The course will explore the political institutions, social structures, economic organization and cultural production of Byzantium and place its history in the framework of the wider global history and culture.



HIS 134 Introduction to the Medieval History of Western Europe

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari or C. Schabel

Through the explanation of the methods used for the study and research of the Middel Ages, the course attempts to give an analysis of what is generally perceived as Middle Ages chronologically, geographically and ideologically. It also provides an overview of the main political events that led to the formation of medieval Europe through demographic, social, institutional, ideological and intellectual changes. The millenium conventionally called ‘the Middle Ages’ is not studied as ‘the Dark Ages’ but as a very important period of western European history, that determined the political, social and ideological identiy of modern Europe.

 

HIS 144 Introduction to Ancient History

Instructor: T. Mavrogiannis

Objectives of the course: Discerning the chronological periods in Ancient History. Studing the sources: written, epigraphical, numismatics, papyri, monuments and material life. Developing critical thought on phaenomena of political, social and economic history in ancient Greek History. Understanding basic structural features of the ancient Greek History: polis – state, reforms of constitutions, colonizations, history and civililization of the ancient Greek world.

 

HIS 181 Introduction to Modern European History (1789-1918)

Instructor: G. Kazamias

The course aims to give students an overview of European History for the period 1789-1918; The geographical focus is mainly on Western Europe. Topics of the course include: Europe before the French Revolution – The Revolution and its European aspects – The Napoleonic Wars – The Congress of Vienna and the construction of a new balannce in Europe – The successive waves of Revolutions (1820-1849) – Europe during the reign of Napoleon III – New Ideologies, national and social movements – Bismarck and his era – social and technological progress: A New Europe – Colonialism – Europe, armed camps, allinaces and the road to war – The 1914-18 war: the cuases of war and its progress until 1918 – The revolution in Russia – The end of the Great War.

 

 

[Back to Top]


 

 

II.2 ELECTIVE COURSES IN HISTORY (4th-8th Semester)

 

 

HIS 201 Hellenistic Times-The Seleucids

Instructor: T. Mavrogiannis

Students should understand the significance of the Seleucid Kingdom for the History of Near East, the spreading of Hellenism in the immense areas of the Persian Empire and be able to evaluate the cultural achievement of the Seleucids in the mingling of the Greeks with other peoples, especially Jews.

 

HIS 204 Greece on the Threshold of Two Centuries: From Crisis to Revival, 1897-1914

Instructor: D. Kontogeorgis

The course aims to expand the students’ knowledge and understanding of a pivotal period of modern Greek history. It will focus on the era from the Greek defeat in the Greco-Turkish 1897 War and the imposition of International Financial Control in 1898 to the 1909 military coup, the rise of Eleftherios Venizelos to power (1910) and the victory of Greece in the Balkan Wars. Emphasis will be accorded to political developments, mainly the crisis of parliamentary institutions and the emergence of new political parties, and also to the period’s ideological ferment, such as the demotistic movement, the renewal of socialist thought and the transformation of Greek nationalism etc. Internal changes will be correlated to the country’s foreign affairs, in particular the Macedonian and Cretan question, in the context of European developments.

 

HIS 206 The British Isles, Europe and the World (ca. 1500-1914)

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

This course aims at introducing students to the main parameters of modern British History in order to make better sense of the culture and the factors which feed into the literary and linguistic production of the modern period. The course will start at the beginning of the 16th century (ca. 1500), and the Tudor accession, giving a bird’s eye view of the British Isles on the eve of the Reformation. It will cover the long Reformation on the British Isles and the political, religious, cultural and social upheavals related to it, up until the Hanoverian Succession and the Act of Union (1707). It will also cover Britain’s relationship with other European countries, their political and religious ties, particularly through contacts with the exiled communities in Geneva, Antwerp, France as well as the Stewart Kings’ disastrous involvement in the Thirty Years’ War. It will also discuss overseas exploration, trade and settlements in the new world, before turning to developments in science and thought (the scientific revolution and the enlightenment period). It will discuss the American war of independence, as well as Britain’s role in the balance of power in Europe in the 18th century. Finally, it will focus on the industrial revolution, developments in politics, as well as Britain’s role as a colonial/imperial power throughout the 19th century until the eve of the First World War.

 

HIS 207 The Normans in Sicily and Southern Italy (11th-13th Centuries)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the course is to study the conquest of Southern Italy and particularly Sicily by the Normans in the course of the 11th century as well as the history of the Kingdom of Sicily from its foundation ((coronation of Roger II on 25 December 1130) until 1268, when it passed into the hands of Charles of Anjou after the defeat of its last Hohenstaufen heir. The relations of the Normans with the Crusader States and the Byzantine Empire are also investigated and a short introductory overview of the creation of the Duchy of Normandy between 910 and 1060 and of the conquest of England in 1066 is provided.

 

HIS 208 Political History of Modern Greece II (1950-1974)

Instructor: P. Papapolyviou

Presentation of the main features and problems of post-war Greece, following the end of the Civil War until the Restoration of Democracy, in 1974. Subjects include: Greece’s Place in the Post-War world – The accession to NATO. The Greek Foreign policy – The Cyprus issue. The reconstruction of Greek society after the Civil War – Economy, industry and urbanization. Political and state developments. Political parties and institutions. The rise and fall of C. Karamanlis (1955-1963). The Colonels’ dictatorship (1967-1974) and the Restoration of Democracy (1974).

 

HIS 209 Alexander the Great

Instructor: T. Mavrogiannis

Presentation of the historical personality of Alexander on the grounds of the foundation of the Macedonian Kingdom and the creation of a new political status, the Empire of Alexander, description of the military campaign against the Persians, recognition of the intentions of Alexander, implications and consequences in the creation of a New World, the Hellenistic.

 

HIS 211 Rome and the Roman Empire

Instructor: [H&A Department Instructor]

To stimulate the interest of the students for the ancient Rome and for the Roman Empire in order that they undestand its impact on the creation of modern Europe.

 

HIS 217 The Crusades

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The course mainly focuses on the crusades launched with the intention of recovering from or defending against the Muslims the Holy Land and the Crusader States founded in Syria and Palestine (11th-13th centuries). However, later crusades against ‘new infidels’, heretics or fellow Christians in Europe and the Mediterranean (the Iberian Peninsula, Southern France, Northern Africa, North-Eastern Europe and the Baltic, the Byzantine Empire and the Aegean) in the 13th-16th centuries) are also studied.

 

HIS 220 Late Antiquity

Instructor: T. Mavrogiannis

The objectives of the course are: Description of the term «Late Antiquity», examination of the transition from Hellenism to Christianity, presentation of the monuments of the Early Christian Period in Cyprus.

 

HIS 225 Political History of Modern Greece (1909-2000)

Instructor: P. Papapolyviou

Presentation of the main characteristics and problems of Greece, from the eve of the Balkan Wars (1912-1913), until the modern era. Subjects include: The Balkan Wars (1912-1913) and the World War I. The “National Schism” and the Catastrophe in Asia Minor – The Refugee problem. The turbulent Republic (1924-1935): Political instability, military interventions and the Metaxas dictatorship (1936-1941). The Greek Foreign policy: The Treaty of Lausanne (1923) and the second venizelist golden age. The World War II: Occupation and Resistance (1941-1944). The Civil War (1946-1949). Greece’s Place in the Post-War world – The Greek Foreign policy – The Cyprus issue. The rise and fall of C. Karamanlis (1955-1963). The Colonels’ dictatorship (1967-1974) and the Restoration of Democracy (1974).

 

HIS 230 Women in Western Medieval Society (400-1500)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The course intends to give a general survey of the role of women in European society during the Middle Ages. Geographically, the course covers mainly Western Europe, but the Latin Crusader States in the Eastern Mediterranean, including the Lusignan Kingdom of Cyprus, are also studied briefly. The period under study extends from early Middle Ages to the end of late Middle Ages (400-1500). Our investigation of the role and status of medieval women takes into consideration the following parametres: the ideological and institutional framework (religion, Church, and law) and the formation of social prejudices, the biological identity of women as the factor defining their main role in society (marriage, family), the contribution of women to economy (in rural and urban areas), female monasticism, women of aristocratic and royal families and their role in politics, and, finally, women’s artistic and literary production.

 

HIS 231 History of Political Thought in the West (14th-18th Centuries)

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

Τhis course examines basic aspects of the history of political thought in the West, between the 14th and the 18th centuries. The course will focus on issues such as the rise and establishment of absolute monarchy as a system in Europe, republican government in a number of early modern city-states, theories of parliamentary (and other representation), the relationship between lay and ecclesiastical authority, the relationship between morality and politics, the relationship between politics and religion, the question of rebellion against the monarch/tyrant, issues of religious tolerance, questions of international relations, as well as issues that became popular during the enlightenment period, such as the separation of authorities, people’s rights, questions of equality, social contract etc. The course covers the centuries between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. The specific period witnessed great changes – political and religious upheaval and war, scientific and geographical discoveries, the rise of the dynastic states, and the Enlightenment era. The course will discuss the political, religious and cultural background of the period between ca. 15001800 referring to figures such as Erasmus, Luther, Galileo Galilei, Louis XIV the Sun-King et al who left their mark on European history and modern western culture.

 

HIS 232 History of the High Middle Ages of the West (1000-1300)

Instructor: C. Schabel

Chronological survey and thematic examination of the history of Western Europe from the economic revival after the New Invasions ca. 1000 until the beginning of economic stagnation and population decline ca. 1300. Special emphasis is given to the expansion of Europe (e.g., with the Crusades and the Reconquista), the Holy Roman Empire and the papacy, religious orders (e.g., new monastic orders, heresy, the mendicants), the rise of the universities, the evolution of France and England, and women and society in the High Middle Ages.

 

HIS 233 History of the Late Middge Ages of the West (1300-1500)

Instructor: C. Schabel

Chronological survey and thematic examination of the history of Western Europe from the fall of the Crusader States ca. 1300 until the start of the Reformation ca. 1500. Special emphasis is given to the crises of the era (e.g., the Black Death, the Hundred Years' War, the Great Schism of the West), Church and State, religious movements (e.g., new heresies, mysticism), the spread of universities, the evolution of France and England, and women and society in the Late Middle Ages.

 

HIS 234 History of the Frankish Rule in Cyprus (1191/2-1489)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The political history of the period is investigated in connection with the role the island played for the politics and interests of the powers of the time: western European (France, German Empire and Italian maritime cities), crusader states in the East, the Byzantine Empire and the Muslim states (Mamluks, Seljuks, Ottomans). The social history of the period examines the relation between the introduced feudal political, social and economic institutions and the preexisting Byzantine system. The course also discusses the formation of conditions of coexistence between the native Greek population and the Latin settlers in the social, ecclesiastical and cultural domains as well as phenomena of cultural interaction and assimilation and self-perception and the perception of the Other.

 

HIS 235 Medieval Intellectual History

Instructor: C. Schabel

Mainly chronological examination of the history of education, science, philosophy, and theology in the Medieval West from the decline of the Roman Empire until the Reformation. Among the most important topics are the Latin Fathers of the Church, schools and scriptoria in the Early Middle Ages, the achievements of Islam, translations, the Twelfth-century Renaissance, the rise of universities, the mendicants, theology and philosophy in the fourteenth century, new political ideas, Humanism and late Scholasticism, the foundations of the Reformation and the Scientific Revolution.

 

HIS 236 Latin Greece (1191-1669)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the course is to give an overview of the history of the various Latin (Frankish, Venetian, Genoese, et al.) states and colonies that were founded in the Byzantine territory as a result of the Third and Fourth Crusades (Cyprus, Constantinople, the Morea, Crete, the Aegean and Ionian islands, etc.). The short and long-term effects of these conquests on the political, social and economic history of the different areas of the Greek world that came under Latin rule will be investigated as well as the religious, cultural and ideological relations and influences between Latins and Greeks.

 

HIS 242 Hellenistic Times –The Ptolemies

Instructor: T. Mavrogiannis

The objectives of the course are: Understanding the peculiarities of the Ptolemaic Kingdom among the Hellenistic States and the creation of a Greek-Egyptian civilization, as well as the position of Ptolemaic Cyprus among the external possessions and the unexplored topography of Ptolemaic Alexandria.

 

HIS 243 Roman History-The Empire

Instructor: [H&A Department Instructor]

A first part focuses on the political history helping the students to understand the transition from the Res publica of Augustus to more absolute forms of rule of his successors. The second part studies the institutions, the provincial organization, the social structures of the Roman world, and the cultural dialogue between Rome and the Hellenistic East. The third part covers the period of the crisis that marked the 3rd century AD, the emergence of a new military aristocracy, the reforms of Diocletian and the predominance of Christianity with Constantine.

 

HIS 249 Classical Athens

Instructor: T. Mavrogiannis

The aims of the course are: Comprehension of the Classical Miracle and the history of Classical Athens and the civilization which led to the democratic constitution, as well as of the exportation of "Atticism" to the East.

 

HIS 250 Introduction to Early Modern European History (ca. 1500-1789)

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

The course covers the centuries between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. The specific period witnessed great changes – political and religious upheaval and war, scientific and geographical discoveries, the rise of the dynastic states, and the Enlightenment era. The course will discuss the political, religious and cultural background of the period between ca. 1500-1800 referring to figures such as Erasmus, Luther, Galileo Galilei, Louis XIV the Sun-King et al who left their mark on European history and modern western culture.

 

HIS 257 Economic and Social History of Modern Greece

Instructor: D. Kontogeorgis

The course aims to introduce the students to the economic and social history of Greece from the Greek Revolution to the first decades of the 20th century (1821-1922). Emphasis will be accorded to the developments in the Greek state, without disregarding the economic activity of the Greek diaspora communities and of the Greeks in the Ottoman Empire.

 

HIS 266 The Italian Maritime Cities in the Eastern Mediterranean (12th-16th Centuries)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the course is to give a general survey of the role of the Italian maritime republics (mainly Venice and Genoa, but also Amalfi and Pisa) in the politics and economy of the Eastern Mediterranean states (Kingdom of Jerusalem, Cyprus, Byzantine Empire and especially Crete and the other Aegean and Ionian islands, Seljuk emirates in Asia Minor, Egypt, Black Sea) from the time of the First Crusade and the foundation of the crusader states to the spectacular expansion of the Ottomans and their domination of the area in the 16th century. The course mainly studies the importance of the presence of the Italians in the region as traders, seamen, soldiers, and founders of communities and colonies as well as carriers of the western culture in the East.

 

HIS 274 Crete under Venetian Rule (1204/11-1669)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The course involves the study of the political and social history of Crete under Venetian rule as well as the investigation of matters that concern the intercultural and ideological relations between the Greek and the Venetian population of the island and between the colony and the metropolis (especially in the domains of religion, language, literature, art, and ethnic identity).

 

HIS 280 History of Cyprus (1878-1974)

Instructor: P. Papapolyviou

Presentation of the modern and contemporary political, social, educational and economic history of Cyprus from 1878 to 1974.

 

HIS 283 European History (1945-1989)

Instructor: G. Kazamias

Students should be able to understand and explain the novel aspects of postwar European history, aspects that have formed and shaped its later development. They should be able to locate and explain the importance and the role of notions that have come into being post-war (the role of the superpowers, competition between them, economic development etc.) and set them in their historical context, for Europe and its nations. Subjects include: The end of the Second World War and the division of Europe – The Cold war: beginning and development – European Reconstruction I: The Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan – Reconstruction II: the Sovietisation of Eastern Europe – The neutrals: between east and west – Political developments east and west – Developments in Britain, France, Germany – Decolonization – The crises in Germany, Suez and Hungary – European Integration and the creation of united Europe – Detente: from Brezhnev to Gorbachev – The Fall of the Wall and the re-unification of Europe.

 

HIS 285 Europe 1918-1945: From the Treaty of Versallles to the Fall of Nazi Germany

Instructor: G. Kazamias
 
To allow students to understand the main developments in 1918-1945 Europe, mainly in the countries of Western Europe. Subjects include: The Treaty of Versailles – victors and vanquished of the Great War - A New Europe: revolutionary movements 1919-1921 – The 1920s: in search of a new balance – Attempts at cooperation and collective security – The League of Nations – The Economic Crash of 1929 and its repercussions – Fascism and Nazism in Europe. The rise of Authoritarianism and their spread in Europe – Towards war: dynamic responses and alliances – Dress rehearsal for war: the Spanish Civil War – European Culture in the inter-war years The Second World War. From Phony War to Total War – War in the desert, in the air, at sea – US in the war - The Conquerors and the Conquered: resistance and co-operation – The Holocaust (Shoah) – The Allies counterattack: from El Alamein and Stalingrad to Normandy – Invasion Europe: Normandy, Germany and the fall of the Third reich – The end of the war in Europe.

 

HIS 286 History of South-Eastern Europe (c. 1800-1990)

Instructor: G. Kazamias
 
Students should be able to understand and explain main developments in the region conventionally called ‘the Balkans’, the differences and commonalities in their historical development compared to Western Europe. Following a broadly chronological framework, aspects of the history of the peoples of the Balkan peninsula are examined, such as, -the influence of empires and the inheritance of the Ottoman Empire and the other empires that have been active in the region. -emancipation struggles, national movements and the birth and development of the national states -irredentism and the ‘national plans’ of the new states and the relationship with the real capabilities of the states at the time of their creation.
 
 

HIS 289 Greece in the 1940s. A Decade of Crisis: Greek-Italian War – Occupation – Resistance – Civil War

Instructor: P. Papapolyviou

Presentation of the critical decade of 1940 in the Greek history; the results of the Greek-Italian war (1940-1941) and the Axis occupation (1941-1944); the Civil War. Subjects include: The Italian attack on Greece – The Axis Occupation. The old political parties and the Communist Party of Greece (K.K.E.). The main Resistance organizations: EAM – ELAS, EDES, EKKA. The events in the Middle East and the Lebanon Conference. The fascist atrocities – The Holocaust of the Greek Jews. The Liberation and the December 1944 events. Post-War troubles - The Civil War – The "Truman Doctrine".

 

HIS 290 History of the European Idea

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

Τhis course discusses the construction of the European idea beginning with antiquity and up to the present. How did Europeans imagine their continent? What are the geographical limits of Europe? What are the common characteristics that Europeans share? What is Europe’s cultural legacy? When was the idea of Europe as that of a separate continent born? Using primary sources, the course examines the idea of Europe during different periods in time and focuses on the features, which European intellectuals understood as shared throughout the centuries. It discusses thus the search for the European identity through the contact and comparison of the Europeans with "others".

 

 

[Back to Top]


 

 

II.3 SEMINARS IN HISTORY (6th-8th Semester)

 

 

HIS 302 The Fourth Crusade and the First fall of Constantinople (1204): Causes and Consequences, Interpretation and Ideology

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the seminar is to explore different interpretations concerning the causes that led to the capture of Constantinople by the crusaders in 1204. Through the study of primary sources, both Western and Byzantine, the seminar explores different interpretations concerning the causes that led to the capture of Constantinople by the crusaders in 1204. It also investigates the short and longterm effects that this major historical event had on the political and social history of different areas of the Greek world that came under Latin rule as well as its impact on the formation of ideological prejudices and historical bias between the Westerners and the Greeks.

 

HIS 306 Oral History Seminar

Instructor: G. Kazamias

This course aims to bring students in contact with oral history, its uses, challenges and pitfalls. Students learn through contact with the theory and practice of oral history, usually through the events of the Turkish Invasion of 1974 in Cyprus (either war-related or connected to the experiences of displacement and rehabilitation of displaced persons). On each occasion a cycle of testimonies is chosen and new oral accounts are drawn for this.

 

HIS 307 The History of Cypriot Volunteerism during British Rule

Instructor: P. Papapolyviou

The aim of the seminar is to familiarize the students with primary sources of the Modern Cypriot history, promotion of critical thinking, composition of academic essay, general knowledge of the topic. Subjects included: Cypriot fighters in the Greek War of the Independence. The Cypriot Volunteerism and the revolutionary uprisings in Epirus, Thessaly, Macedonia and Crete during the 19th century. The participation of Cyprus in the GrecoTurkish War of 1897, the Balkan Wars (1912-1913) and the Asia Minor campaign (1919-1922). Cypriot soldiers in the British Army during World War I and II. The "Cyprus Regiment" (1939-1945). The participation of Cypriot women.

 

HIS 309 History of Modern Greek Diaspora

Instructor: D. Kontogeorgis

This lesson aims to introduce the students to the history of the Greek diaspora from the 16th century to the first decades of the 20th emphasizing on the Greek paroikias/communites established in Italy, Central Europe, Russian Empire and Egypt. Subjects include: The Ottoman conquest of the Balkans and the formation of the Greek paroikias/settlements in Italy. The case of the Greek paroikia in Venice. The “Conquering Balkan Orthodox Merchant”. The Greek settlement in Northern Balkans and Central Europe (Austria, Hungrary/Transylavania): The Hapsburg efforts to lure merchants to their lands and the establishment of the two Greek communities in Vienna. The Greek diaspora in Russia Ι: The establishment of the Greek paroikias in Odessa and Taganrog. Institutional status and community organization. The Greek diaspora in Russia II. Rural communities in Mariupol and the Caucasus. The Greek communities in the Balkans during the 19th century: From the Ottoman Empire to the nation states. Egypt. The status and life of the Greek communities in the British Empire. Greek commercial networks (land/maritime) and Greek diaspora. Merchants, workers and free professions. Social stratification of the Greek diaspora communities. Greek diaspora and Modern Greek culture: Religious humanism, Modern Greek Enlightenment. Education and voluntary associations in the Greek diaspora. The “national center” and the Greek communities: Cooperation and dissensions. Dependences and independent course. Communities and host societies: Isolation, integration – cosmopolitanism.

 

HIS 313 Perceptions and Strategies around the Afterlife in Byzantium

Instructor: D. Stathakopoulos

The aim of the course is to study various aspects the Byzantine perceptions of death and the afterlife, but also the ways in which Byzantines tried to achieve their personal salvation. Furthermore, the course will enable the students to carefully explore a significant number of primary sources as well as the results of modern research on the topics covered in class. Topics include:Byzantine perceptions and customs around death: historical and anthropological observations. The Biblical tradition of the afterlife and its transformations. Byzantine visions of Paradise and Hell. Between death and the Second Coming: the fear of punishment. Charity as a means of salvation I: charity. Charity as a means of salvation II: Liturgical commemoration and the foundation of monasteries. The Byzantines and Purgatory at the council of Ferrara-Florence.

 

HIS 320 The Era of the Fall of Constantinople

Instructor: D. Stathakopoulos

The aim of the course is to critically examine the last 60 years of the Byzantine Empire, avoiding the teleological knowledge of its end and focusing on the political processes, economic and social developments and the cultural achievements of the period. Furthermore, the course will enable the acquaintance of students with a significant number of primary sources as well as the results of modern research on the topics covered in class. Topics include: On the way to the Fall: from empire to city-state. The Byzantine economy in the 15th century: a poor state with rich citizens. Manuel II in the West (1400-1402) and the radiance of the empire in decline. The Byzantines in Ferrara-Florence (1438-1439). Ottomans or Latins? Unionists and Anti-Unionists on the eve of the Fall. Thessaloniki between Byzantines, Venetians and Ottomans. The Despotate of Mystras as an alternative Byzantine court. Mazaris and George Gemistos (Plethon): the intellectuals of Mystras. The Fall of Constantinople and the end of Byzantium. The eschatological interpretation of the Fall and the legends that ensued. The conquest of the Peloponnese and the political decisions of the local elites.

 

HIS 321 Byzantium and the Crusades

Instructor: D. Stathakopoulos

Byzantium is a crucial part of the history of the Crusades. The Empire probably played an important role in the proclamation of the First Crusade (1095-1099), was a crossing point for their troops, gained close (not always friendly) relations with the Crusaders and was finally conquered by the troops of the Fourth Crusade in 1204. The aim of this course is to offer an analysis critical evaluation of these events and their consequences. Furthermore, the course will enable the acquaintance of students with a significant number of primary sources as well as the results of modern research on the topics covered in class.

 

HIS 325 Aspects of Modern Greek Economic and Social History: Rural Economy and Foreign Trade during the 19th Century

Instructor: D. Kontogeorgis

This lesson aims to introduce the students to the history of 19th century Greek agriculture, and in general rural economy, mainly from the Greek Revolution (1821-1832) until the first decades of the 20th century. The course is focused on regions of the Greek state (Peloponnesus, Central Greece, Thessaly), although the agricultural development of Macedonia, Crete, Asia Minor/Anatolia and of some Aegean Sea islands (Chios, Lesvos) will also be presented. The course will address both economic and social (the organization of household, the institution of dowry) aspects of the Greek rural society, including the livestock sector. Among the subjects which will be studied are productivity, agricultural techniques, the contribution of the state to agricultural modernization. Emphasis will be accorded to the most commercially successful cases, such as currants, olive and tobacco, and their place in the context of Greece’s foreign trade.

 

HIS 331 Social History of the Latin Eastern States: Jerusalem – Cyprus – Romania, 11th-13th Centuries

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the seminar is to compare the institutions that were introduced to the various Latin states, founded in the Eastern Mediterranean and in Byzantine territory by the crusaders. Geographically, the seminar covers the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem, the Lusignan Kingdom of Cyprus, and some of the crusader states that were created in Byzantine territory under Latin rule or Romania (Constantinople, Morea, Crete). Chronologically, the period under study ends by the end of the 13th century with the disappearance of many of the above states, with the exception of Cyprus and Crete. The study of the relationship between the introduced feudal political, social and economic institutions with the pre-existing system will allow us to trace the formation of the context of peaceful cohabitation between the Latin settlers and the indigenous populations in the social as well as the religious and cultural domains and to understand the complex processes of cultural interaction and assimilation and the creation of new identities.

 

HIS 332 The Ecclesiastical History of Frankish Cyprus

Instructor: C. Schabel

The seminar focuses on the analysis of the ecclesiastical history of the island from the Frankish conquest until the Council of Constance, in particular the consequences of the conquest for the Greek clergy, the establishment and the internal history of the Latin ecclesiastical hierarchy, monasticism, the relations between the Greek and Latin clergies, and significant events, such as the martyrdom of the thirteen monks of Kantara.

 

HIS 333 Frankish Greece, 1204-1261

Instructor: C. Schabel

The seminar focuses on the history of Constantinople and Frankish Greece from the conquest of the City by the Latins in the Fourth Crusade (1204) until its reconquest by Emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos (1261). This is an interesting period for which we have few courses, which creates a number of hermeneutical problems.

 

HIS 334 The Ecclesiastical History of Greek Areas under Latin rule, 1196-1261

Instructor: C. Schabel

The seminar examines the Church and religion in the first decades of the Frankish period in Cyprus and in Greece, from the establishment of the Latin clergy in 1196 and 1204 until the publication of the Bulla Cypria and the conquest of Constantinople by Michael Palaiologos in 1260 and 1261. Special emphasis is given to the secular clergy, monasticism, and the Greek population.

 

HIS 341 Provinces of the Eastern Roman Empire

Instructor: [H&A Department Instructor]

Study of similarities and differences between the Roman provinces of the East. Historical and archaeological survey of the eastern Roman provinces from the time of their integration into the Empire until the Late Antiquity.

 

HIS 343 Ancient Religion

Instructor: [H&A Department Instructor]

The general title Ancient Religion covers several cycles of courses that are consecrated each time on different aspects of the religious life of Greek and Roman societies. The students read the Greek and Latin authors, and study inscriptions, coins and the monumental topography of the sacred landscape. The following courses have been offered until now : Heroization and Apotheosis, Cults of the monarchs, Imperial Cult, Greco-Roman cults and early Christianity.

 

HIS 354 Cyprus under Venetian Rule (1474/89-1570/1)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the seminar is to give a general survey of the history of Cyprus during the 82-year long colonial rule of the island by the Republic of Venice. Through the systematic study of primary sources, the aim of the seminar is to examine the political and social history of the period (focusing on the Ottoman threat, the continuity of the Frankish institutions or the introduction of new ones and social mobility) and to investigate matters concerning the intercultural and ideological relations between the Greek and the Venetian population of the island and between the colony and the metropolis (especially in the domains of religion, language, literature, art, and ethnic identity).

 

HIS 356 Roman Cyprus

Instructor: [H&A Department Instructor]

Analysis of various aspects of the history of ancient Cyprus as a Roman province focusing on a comparative study of written sources and archaeological evidence. Historical and archaeological survey of Roman Cyprus from 58 BC until the 7th century AD.

 

HIS 357 Byzantium and the Rise of Islam

Instructor: D. Stathakopoulos

The aim of the course is to examine in detail the way in which the Byzantines faced the threat to the territorial integrity of their state from the Islamic invasions as well as the historical course of the empire until the beginning of its gradual economic, political and cultural revival in the late 8th century. Furthermore, the course will familiarize students with a significant number of primary sources as well as the results of modern research on the topics covered in the classroom. This course covers the transitional period that preceded and followed the Arab conquest of large parts of the Byzantine Empire in the seventh century and the trauma it caused. Initially, Byzantium struggled to limit Arab expansion in the East. Many administrative reforms testify to this effort, and perhaps equally, one of the most emblematic theological controversies associated with the Eastern Empire, that of Iconoclasm.

 

HIS 362 Colonialism and the Economy

Instructor: G. Kazamias

The course aims to give a first taste of the economic history of Cyprus during colonial times (1878-1960). Lectures will give the basic tenets and aspects of economic history incl. public finances, trade, industry, the banking system and social structure of the island. The economy of Cyrpus and its evolution will be examined under the British colonial economic lens. Subjects include: The British accession of Cyprus (1878) - principles of Colonial governance – individualities of Cyprus: the “Turkish Tribute”- an agrarian economy and society – internal and external trade and the development of home industries and small industry – the Mining sector – the flow of money: money lenders, banks and the co-operative movement – the rise and the demands of the working class – nationalism, wars, economic crises and the economy – economy and society: evidence from the Censuses.

 

HIS 363 History of the Book from Gutenberg to the French Revolution

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

The course will approach the history of the book in Western Europe from the invention of printing (ca. 1445) until roughly the outbreak of the French Revolution (18th century). It aims at familiarising students with the relationship between the history of the book and great intellectual and political movements in Europe, such as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the scientific discoveries, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution as well as the first indications of ‘national’ awareness among European states/peoples in the early modern period. It will also explore issues such as the history of libraries, the relationship between book/printing and education, the book and the mapping of the world, printing and the rise of the media/information and public sphere (journals, newspapers etc.), as well as more ‘light-hearted’ aspects such as the history of reading, entertainment, private collections of books and their significance etc. Moreover, it will address issues such as networks of distribution, paying attention to the complicated relationships between authors-editors-publishers/printers-booksellers.

 

HIS 366 Byzantine Scholars in Italy (from the Council of Ferrara-Florence to the End of the 16th Century)

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

This seminar focuses on the lives, career and work of the Greek scholars from Byzantium who emigrated to the Italian peninsula from ca. the Council of Ferrara-Florence (1438-45) to the end of the 16th century. It will consider the lives and work of figures such as Cardinal Bessarion, Emmanuel Chrysoloras, Joannes Argyropoulos, George of Trebizond, Janus Lascaris, Laonicus and Demetrius Chalcocondyles, Theodore Gaza, Marcus Mousourus, and others, whose positions in Italian Universities and elsewhere (often acquired through the patronage of powerful Italian princes) contributed to the diffusion of classical studies throughout the Italian peninsula at the time of the Renaissance. These scholars also had a critical role to play in the Greek printing which was developed in the Italian cities, as they worked as editors, workshop correctors, translators, authors as well as printers themselves. This seminar will address and consider these various aspects of their lives, alongside their rich literary and philosophical production, while it will also touch upon the question of their identity and their role as cultural agents between Byzantium/Greeks and Italians/Latins.

 

HIS 369 Classics in Europe, 14th-17th Centuries

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

This course touches upon the reception of classical texts by European scholars during the period 14th-17th centuries. The examination will begin with a discussion of the Italian Renaissance and humanism and the conditions, more generally that promoted the interest/turn to classical tradition (Italian city-states, contacts with Byzantine scholars, educational needs of a rising political class, etc.). The course will analyse the ways in which this reception took place (translations, teaching, commentaries, the writing of texts following classical examples, etc.). The course will also anaylse the manner in which classical texts and examples were used in different subjects (e.g. moral thought, politics, medicine, mathematics, rhetoric, etc.), as well as the manner in which the changing political and social circumstances shaped the interests, agendas as well as approach adopted by these scholars: e.g. the Italian wars, the Italian city-states and princely courts, the Reformation, the rise of monarchical states, the wars of religion, the discovery of new worlds, raison d’état theories and the Thirty Years’ War, etc. The course will discuss, among others, the work of scholars such as Collucio Salutati, Marsilio Ficino, Machiavelli, Guicciardini, Montaigne, Rabelais, Melanchthon, Justus Lipsius et als.

 

HIS 370 Women in Cyprus under Latin Rule (1191-1571)

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari

The aim of the seminar is to give a general survey of the role of women in the Cypriot society during the Middle Ages and to show their contribution despite the anonymity of both contemporary sources and modern historiography. The chronological limits of this introduction to women’s studies and, more generally, gender studies in medieval Cyprus cover both the Lusignan (1191/21489) and the Venetian periods (1489-1571). The geographical limits go beyond the insular kingdom as social institutions and cultural models of gender were formed in accordance with those in Western Europe and the Byzantine Empire. Our investigation of the role and status of medieval women takes into consideration the following parametres: the ideological and institutional framework (religion, Church, and law) and the formation of social prejudices, the biological identity of women as the factor defining their main role in society (marriage, family), the contribution of women to economy (in rural and urban areas), female monasticism, women of aristocratic and royal families and their role in politics, and, finally, women’s artistic and literary production.

 

HIS 371 Aspects and Imprints of War in Contemporary Times

Instructor: G. Kazamias

The aim of the course is to bring students into contact with aspects of war as seen through different media (film, theatre, literature, newspaper articles) and the means used to promote war-related message; to understand aspects of the effects on society, culture diplomacy and economics of the most destructive event devised by the human race.

 

HIS 373 Cold War Conflicts: the Greek Civil War, the Korean War, the Vietnam

Instructor: G. Kazamias

This course aims to develop the knowledge and critical thought of students through study of lesser known aspects of contemporary history that are not normally part of the established curriculum. Encourage critical thought on them. Encourage use and evaluation of primary sources in their research. The course of the Cold War is examined through instances when the Cold War turned into a conventional conflict. The causes that made each conflict begin and the superpower involvement to it, the ways each conflict developed and the reactions of the superpowers, the role of the leaders, how conflicts ended and the international situation after the end of each conflict are some of the themes examined.

 

HIS 374 Contemporary Public Monuments and Historical Memory

Instructor: G. Kazamias

This course aims to examine the monuments erected to commemorate individuals or groups that have played a role in events in modern and contemporary history; and explain their function in ceremonies of commemoration. Some of the questions asked are: does the content of historical events change over time? Does the manner of commemoration change? Does the history of a national group alter over time? How are these reflected in the monuments erected?

 

HIS 375 The Italian Renaissance

Instructor: N. Constantinidou

The objectives of the course are: Understanding, analysis, and interpretation of the specific historical period. Understanding of the complexity of the factors which contributed to the Italian intellectual and cultural renaissance as well as a general assessment of the significance of the historical period in question and the relevant intellectual movement. Development of critical and analytical thinking through approaching primary and secondary sources as well as contradictory interpretations. Development of oral and written examination skills through their class/discussion participation. The course will begin with the first sings of the Italian Renaissance, the social and political background that relates to humanism (such as the Italian city-states of Florence, Venice, Rome etc.), the revival of the Latin and Greek letters, the role of the Greek refugees/immigrants to the Italian peninsula during the 15th and 16th century, the art of the Renaissance, the relationship between humanism and occultism, humanism and science, humanism and religion, but also humanism and paganism. The course will also discuss the work of famous intellectual figures and artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Machiavelli, Leon Battista Alberti etc.

 

HIS 388 Historiography in the Latin-Ruled Greek World (12th-16th Centuries): Problems of Historicity and Ideology

Instructor: A. Nicolaou-Konnari
By way of a comparative approach, the course aims at the study of various historical texts (chronicles, annals, narrative poems, manuscript historical notes, memoranda and relazioni) from the Latin-ruled Greek world (Cyprus, Morea, Ionian Sea, Crete, the Agean) during the Byzantine and post-Byzantine periods. Various aspects of the process of history writing are investigated, such as historiographical genres, language and style, historicity and objectivity, and the ideology propagated by each text in connection with the social environment that produced them. These texts are compared with texts from the Byzantine, Western and Latin Eastern traditions in an attempt to identify relations and influences and to explain the factors that favoured a historiographical production in Cyprus by far richer (in volume, time span and variety) than the one in the other areas.

 

 

[Back to Top]